Course Schedules for 2016-2017

Fall 2016

1113 – Science, Nature, and Society: Historical Perspectives │
Section 001 Professor Peter Barker                                      MW 1:30-2:45 PhSc 402  flyer 
Section 995 Associate Professor Piers Hale                          Online Section 

An introduction to the study of science, technology, and medicine in light of historical, philosophical, and cultural analysis. Focusing on the relationships between science, nature, and society, this class introduces some of the big questions about who we are, who we have been, and who we might become.

Sophomore-Level Courses

2133 – Science and Popular Culture │Blended Courseflyer
Section 001 Associate Professor Katherine Pandora           T 10:30-11:45       PhSc 402
                                                                                                   TBA (web)
Draws on interdisciplinary perspectives to examine the interplay between science and popular culture from the Scientific Revolution to the present.  Topics include representations of science, scientists, and nature in popular literature, television, films, and documentaries; the development of zoos and science museums; children and science; amateur scientists; science fiction; animals and culture; and science journalism.  This course is taught in a blended/hybrid format, with in-class meetings on Tuesdays, and individual and collaborative web-based project activities that take place online to allow fuller exploration of the course topics.

2423 – Social and Ethical Issues in Science, Technology, Environment and Medicine │ flyer
Section 001 Assistant Professor Peter Soppelsa                  MWF 12:30-1:20       Price Hall 3065

An introduction to a range of social and ethical issues in the history of science, technology, environment and medicine.  This discussion-based course focuses on social and ethical issues in STEM (science, technology, environment, and medicine), using various historical case studies as examples.  The course is divided into four sections—Nature, Technology, Science, and Medicine—in order to interpret science, technology, and medicine as different aspects of humankind's relationship with nature.  We explore how humans know nature through science; and manipulate, harness, and attempt to control nature, through medicine and technology.  In turn, nature sets real, material limits on what humans can do.  This course focuses on social and ethical issues arising from STEM fields, such as: environmental impacts and disasters, technological risks and accidents, gender discrimination in science, genetic determinism, and the social power of medicine.

Junior/Senior-Level Courses: Basic Survey Courses

3013 – History of Science to the Age of Newton: The Origins and Early Development of Science │
(2 independently run sections)
Prerequisite: Junior standing, or completion of one lower-division course in HSCI, or permission of instructor
Section 001 Professor Steven Livesey                               MWF 9:30-10:20             Adams 315
Section 002 Professor Rienk Vermij                                    TR 12:00-1:15                 PhSc 403

A survey of understandings of the natural world from Antiquity to the Seventeenth century. This course explores how people in different times and places have explained such phenomena as the motions of the planets and the workings of the human body. Throughout we will pay particular attention to the cultural settings in which theories about the natural world were produced. We will also examine the impact of scientific ideas and discoveries upon human societies and cultures.

3023 - History of Science since the 17th Century: Foundation and Growth of Modern Science │
(2 independently run sections)
Prerequisite: Junior standing, or completion of one lower-division course in HSCI, or permission of instructor
Section 002 Assistant Professor Aparna Nair                      MWF 10:30-11:20          Adams 311
Section 995 Associate Professor Kathleen Crowther        Online

A survey tracing the development of major concepts, discoveries, and methods in physical, biological, and earth sciences, as well as the interaction between science and other institutions, in the early modern and modern periods. Emphasis is given to the growth of scientific thought in modern times, to the effects of increasing respect for science among eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Europeans and Americans, and to the emergence of pure and applied science as major forces in modern civilization.

Junior/Senior-Level Courses: Intermediate Topics Courses

3243 – Women and Medicine│
Prerequisite: Junior standing, or completion of one lower-division course in HSCI, or permission of instructor
Section 001 Associate Professor Kathleen Crowther          TR 8:30-9:45       CORE SRTC 1030

Surveys the relationship between women and medicine in the modern period (roughly between 1750 and the present). Examines the interrelated histories of women as medical practitioners, patients and objects of medical knowledge. Also includes discussion on how women experienced illness in the past and the expectations and norms that shaped their illness experiences. Finally, a look at medical knowledge about women and how ideas about gender have been constructed by the medical professions.

3253 – Race and Science│Honors Section flyer
Prerequisite: Junior standing, or completion of one lower-division course in HSCI, or permission of instructor
Requires permission of the Honors Office for enrollment
Section 001 Assistant Professor Aparna Nair                     TR 9:00-10:15                 PhSc 402

Examines the rise and fall of scientific conceptions of race from 1800 to the present, paying particular attention to its connections to 19th-century evolutionary theory, eugenics, the modern evolutionary synthesis, and recent genetics and genomics. Also looks at the role of cultural values associated with race in science more broadly. Course materials include films and novels as well as nonfiction.

3413 – Biomedical Ethics│
Prerequisite: Junior standing, or completion of one lower-division course in HSCI, or permission of instructor
Section 001 Associate Professor Piers Hale                       MW 3:00-4:15                   Adams 315

Introduces key concepts in biomedical ethics. Topics may include: the doctor/patient relationship; medical research on humans and animals; reproductive rights and technologies; medical decisions at the end of life; and the allocation of scarce resources.

3483 – Technology, Politics, and International Development │ flyer
Prerequisite: Junior standing, or completion of one lower-division course in HSCI, or permission of instructor
Section 900 Associate Professor Suzanne Moon                TR 4:30-5:45                   PhSc 224

Explores the interactions between politics and technology that have informed efforts to produce "developed" industrial societies around the world. Examines the emergence of development thinking and practice in Japan and the colonized world, international development and the technopolitics of decolonization, and contemporary issues in technology and development.

3813 – Science in the Ancient World│
Prerequisite: Junior standing, or completion of one lower-division course in HSCI, or permission of instructor
Section 001 Professor Rienk Vermij                                  TR 3:00-4:15              PhSc 402

An examination of the development of natural philosophy, mathematics and medicine in classical antiquity.  It is generally agreed upon that the western scientific tradition traces its origin to ancient Greece.  Still, the Greeks had different notions of "science", "nature", etc., than we do.  Apart from investigating these ideas themselves, we will also look at their place in ancient society and culture.

4623 – Practicum/Internship in the Digital Humanities│New Course
Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor
Section 001 Associate Professor Katherine Pandora         TR 10:30-11:45                  PhSc 626

A practical, project-based internship, focused on the design and development of a project in the digital humanities under the close supervision of a faculty member.  (Slashlisted with 5623; no student may earn credit for both 4623 and 5623.)

4993 – Capstone in the History of Science, Technology and Medicine│New Day/Time
Prerequisite: Junior standing and permission of instructor
Section 001 Professor Peter Barker                                     MW 10:30-11:45                PhSc 626

This course fulfills the capstone requirement for a major in the history of science, technology and medicine. The goal of this seminar-format course is to provide students with the opportunity to further develop their skills in research, writing, and critical analysis with respect to the historical study of science.

Rev. 07-18-16


Summer 2016

Block A (May 16-June 10) 

3023 – History of Science since 17th Century │
Prerequisite: Junior standing, or completion of one lower-division course in HSCI, or permission of instructor
Section TBA    Associate Professor Suzanne Moon                   Online 

A survey tracing the development of major concepts, discoveries, and methods in physical, biological, and earth sciences, as well as the interaction between science and other institutions, in the early modern and modern periods. Emphasis is given to the growth of scientific thought in modern times, to the effects of increasing respect for science among eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Europeans and Americans, and to the emergence of pure and applied science as major forces in modern civilization.


06-03-16

Spring 2016

For a pdf version of this schedule, click here.

Freshman Level Courses

1113 – Science, Nature, and Society: Historical Perspectives │
Section 995 Associate Professor Piers Hale                      Online

An introduction to the study of science, technology, and medicine in light of historical, philosophical, and cultural analysis. Focusing on the relationships between science, nature, and society, this class introduces some of the big questions about who we are, who we have been, and who we might become.

 Junior/Senior-Level Courses: Basic Survey Courses

3013 – History of Science to the Age of Newton: The Origins and Early Development of Science │
(2 independently run sections)
Prerequisite: Junior standing, or completion of one lower-division course in HSCI, or permission of instructor
Section 001 Professor Steven Livesey                                TR 9:00-10:15                  PhSc 100
Section 002 Professor Rienk Vermij                                  MWF 10:30-11:20            Adams 355

A survey of understandings of the natural world from Antiquity to the Seventeenth century. This course explores how people in different times and places have explained such phenomena as the motions of the planets and the workings of the human body. Throughout we will pay particular attention to the cultural settings in which theories about the natural world were produced. We will also examine the impact of scientific ideas and discoveries upon human societies and cultures.

3023 – History of Science since the 17th Century: Foundation and Growth of Modern Science│
(2 independently run sections)
Prerequisite: Junior standing, or completion of one lower-division course in HSCI, or permission of instructor
Section 001 Associate Professor Katherine Pandora        MWF 9:30-10:20            PhSc 224
Section 002 Assistant Professor Aparna Nair                   MW 3:00-4:15       Hester 148 -- Room Change

A survey tracing the development of major concepts, discoveries, and methods in physical, biological, and earth sciences, as well as the interaction between science and other institutions, in the early modern and modern periods. Emphasis is given to the growth of scientific thought in modern times, to the effects of increasing respect for science among eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Europeans and Americans, and to the emergence of pure and applied science as major forces in modern civilization.

Junior/Senior-Level Courses: Intermediate Topics Courses

3313 – Science and Technology in Asian History │
Prerequisite: Junior standing, or completion of one lower-division course in HSCI, or permission of instructor
Section 900 Associate Professor Suzanne Moon               TR 4:30-5:45                   PhSc 323

Examines science and technology in east, south, and southeast Asia from 1000 A.D. to the present. We examine the influence and interaction of knowledge traditions (especially Chinese, south Asian and Islamic), how they circulate around and beyond Asia, and interactions with European knowledge traditions, culminating in examinations of political and ethical dimensions of science and technology in contemporary Asia.

3333 – Technology and Society in World History │
Prerequisite: Junior standing, or completion of one lower-division course in HSCI, or permission of instructor
Section 001 Assistant Professor Pete Soppelsa                 MWF 11:30-12:20             PhSc 224

A survey of the history of technology since 1500. The course emphasizes historical contexts and cultural meanings, not technical details, as it explores the key steps in the construction of our modern technological world. Materials include literature and film as well as non-fiction.

3353 – Science, Exploration, and Empire│New CourseFlyer
Prerequisite: Junior standing, or completion of one lower-division course in HSCI, or permission of instructor
Section 001 Assistant Professor Aparna Nair                   TR 10:30-11:45                  Dale Hall 116

Examines the contested history of exploration and empire from both western and non-western perspectives and explores colonial and post-colonial encounters in science, both imagined and lived. Focuses on exploration and empire as inextricably linked in the history of modern science, a link that exists on multiple levels, including material, intellectual, moral, and social. Surveys people, things, ideas, and values across cultural and political borders. Materials include travelers' tales, explorers' accounts, fiction, and films as well as nonfiction.

3413 – Biomedical Ethics│
Prerequisite: Junior standing, or completion of one lower-division course in HSCI, or permission of instructor
Section 001 Associate Professor Piers Hale                        TR 3:00-4:15                   GL Cross 0131

Introduces key concepts in biomedical ethics. Topics may include: the doctor/patient relationship; medical research on humans and animals; reproductive rights and technologies; medical decisions at the end of life; and the allocation of scarce resources.

3423 – Modern Medicine – A Historical Introduction│New Time and Location
Prerequisite: Junior standing, or completion of one lower-division course in HSCI, or permission of instructor
Section 001 Associate Professor Kathleen Crowther        TR 10:00-11:15                SRTC 1030

This course explores contemporary issues in medical science, policy and practice through examination of their historical roots. Topics to be discussed include racial and economic disparities in health care, the recent rise in interest in alternative medicine, the epidemics of AIDS and obesity, regulation of the pharmaceutical industry, organ transplantation, genetics, stem-cell research and reproductive technologies.

3443 – Science in a Religious World │ New Time and Location│ Flyer
Prerequisite: Junior standing, or completion of one lower-division course in HSCI, or permission of instructor
Section 001 Assistant Professor Stephen Weldon               TR 3:00-4:15                 Dale Hall Tower 105

The course explores how ideas about the natural world intersect with beliefs about ethical and spiritual matters. It looks at Christian and non-Christian responses to modern science, with an eye to the intellectual and social elements of both science and religion. Beyond that, it takes a global view on the topic and grapples with the very terms that we use to talk about the world of knowledge and the world of faith or belief.

3453 – Science and Civilization in Islam │ Presidential Dream Course
Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor
Section 001 Professor Peter Barker                                    TR 1:30-2:45                  Dale Hall 107

History of scientific traditions and ideas in Islamic civilization, from the origins of Islam to the early modern period. Emphasis is on the derivation, development and transmission of Islamic science, as well as on the assimilation and influence of science within Islamic culture.

3463 - Cold War Science│
Prerequisite: Junior standing, or completion of one lower-division course in HSCI, or permission of instructor
Section 900 Professor Peter Barker                                    MW 4:30-5:45                PhSc 323

Science and technology during the Cold War, including strategic weapons and SDI, medical experiments, the space race, science in popular culture, and science and foreign policy.

3823 – Science in Medieval Culture │
Prerequisite: Junior standing, or completion of one lower-division course in HSCI, or permission of instructor
Section 001 Professor Steven J. Livesey                             TR 12:00-1:15                 Gould 150

The middle ages had a profound impact on the subsequent development of the West, including its scientific development. They may also be studied for their unique and idiosyncratic positions that failed to become part of the Western scientific heritage. This course will attempt to assess both strands within the period, focusing on topics that include the relationship between science and religion, science in its institutional context, the impact of Greek and Arabic science in the High Middle Ages, the social context of science, and medieval assumptions about the nature of science.

3993 – Junior Seminar│
Prerequisite: 9 hours of history of science classes or permission of instructor; if repeating course, permission of undergraduate academic advisor.
Section 001 Associate Professor Piers Hale                        W 9:00-11:50                 Bizzell Library 225

Offers students the chance to work on an extended research topic in the history of science, technology, environment and medicine. The themed seminar format will allow for small group discussion and close supervision of student projects. Students will be introduced to the methods and tools of advanced research which they will use to develop their own research topic that will build upon course materials. Topics covered include The politics of evolution; evolution race and gender; evolution in literature; evolution in popular culture; eugenics; evolution and theology. This course is open to all students who have 9 hours of History of Science credit. In addition, any junior or senior with a major or minor in a relevant field may request permission of the instructor to enroll.

4613 – Issues and Methods in the Digital Humanities│New CourseFlyer
Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor
Section 001 Associate Professor Katherine Pandora         M 1:30-4:20                  PhSc 119

Through interdisciplinary exploration students read, discuss, hack, and reflect with experts in the areas of history and history of science, information studies, geography, literature, classics, computer science, media studies, anthropology, political science, communication, and more. Students will not only become more literate in interpreting digital culture but in applying the technologies of the digital world, acquiring new competencies and insights in the process. (Slashlisted with 5613; no student may earn credit for both 4613 and 5613. 

Revised 12-11-15

History of Science