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Professor Rilla Askew's Creative Writing Students

Course Catalogue

Note: The courses listed here are potential courses, which may or may not be taught in any given semester. To find the courses actually scheduled for a particular semester, click the "Current Courses" or "Upcoming Courses" tabs on the navigation bar. 

1000-LEVEL COURSES

1113 - PRINCIPLES OF ENGLISH COMPOSITION. Systematic analysis of the components of effective writing, with regular practice and close individual assistance. Study of expository prose models. (F, Sp, Su) [I-ENGL]

1213 - PRINCIPLES OF ENGLISH COMPOSITION. Prerequisite: 1113. Systematic analysis of effective argumentative discourse with regular practice and close individual assistance. Study of argumentative prose models. Library research paper required. (F, Sp, Su) [I-ENGL]

​1613 - NATIVE PEOPLES OF OKLAHOMA. A general introduction to the history, cultural traditions, and current condition of many of the 38 Native American tribes who reside in Oklahoma. This course is administered on the online Janux platform, which is the primary host of several videos, readings, discussion forums, and other course materials. Crosslisted with Anthropology 1613. (Irreg.) [IV-NW]

1913 - WRITING FOR THE HEALTH PROFESSIONS. Prerequisite: 1213. Prepares pre-professionals in the health professions for writing they will do in later coursework and in practice. (F, Sp) 1999 000000 Lower Division Transfer Credit This course is not offered at the University of Oklahoma.It is used to denote lower division transfer credit for which there is not OU equivalent course.

2000-LEVEL COURSES

2113 - INTERMEDIATE WRITING. Prerequisite: 1213, application and departmental permission. Writing of non-fiction prose in a workshop setting. Reading and analysis of prose models for analysis. (Irreg.)

2123 - CREATIVE WRITING. Prerequisite: 1213, application and departmental permission. Introduction to imaginative writing, especially short stories and poems; some analysis of literary models, but major emphasis on student writing. (F, Sp)

2133 - AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL WRITING. Prerequisite: 1213, application and departmental permission. Writing essays from personal experience. Reading and analysis of journals, diaries, letters and autobiographies as models for writing. (Irreg.)

2213 - FICTION. fiction as a historical genre in literature. Covered will be sub-genres such as the novel, short story, memoir, travel sketch, etc. Discussion will cover such topics as character, plot and myth in narrative. The emphasis will be on close reading in light of the possibilities of fiction as a genre. (Irreg.) [IV-AF]

2223 - POETRY.
Gives an introduction to the elements and rhetoric of verse. The focus will be on the canon of American and British verse. (Irreg.) [IV-AF]

2233 - DRAMA. A study of major Western plays (from Aeschylus to contemporary playwrights) with emphasis on literary dimensions: design, language, characterization, individual forms (such as tragedy, comedy and pastoral). May include consideration of social and literary contexts as well as acting and theatrical conventions. (Irreg.) [IV-AF]

2243 - FILM NARRATIVE. Introduction to basic visual terminology, filmmaking concerns, film theory and aesthetics. Survey of different approaches to narrative filmmaking (for example, genre or auteur). Also discussion of film and society in regards to how one influences the other. (Irreg.) [IV-AF]

2273 - LITERARY AND CULTURAL ANALYSIS. Prequisite: ENGL 1213. This course offers an introduction to literary and cultural analysis focusing on textual explication, interpretation, and critique. Subjects may include poetic forms (including prosody and scansion, narrative techniques, introduction to genre, and a grounding in basic literary terms. The course emphasizes writing analytically about literature and culture. (F, Sp)

2283 - CRITICAL METHODS: TEXTS/CONTEXTS/THEORIES/CRITICS. Prerequisite: ENGL 1213 and ENGL 2273.This course examines literary and cultural texts in conjunction with texts of theory, criticism or history. The course explores how to read literary texts within relevant frameworks, whether they be historical or other contexts such as gender, race, or colonialism. (F, Sp)

2413 - INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE. Concentrates on close readings of masterpieces in fiction, drama and poetry. The readings are drawn from periods ancient to modern and may be American, British or Continental. (Irreg.) [IV-AF]

2433 - WORLD LITERATURE TO 1700. A reading of literary works, by types, from classical antiquity to 1700. (F) [IV-WC]

2443 - WORLD LITERATURE, 1700 TO PRESENT. Masterpieces of world literature from 1700 to the modern period. (Sp) [IV-WC]

2543 - ENGLISH LITERATURE FROM 1375 TO 1700. A survey of major writers and literary movements from Chaucer through Dryden. (F) [IV-WC]

2653 - ENGLISH LITERATURE FROM 1700 TO THE PRESENT. A survey of major writers and literary movements from Pope to the present. (Sp) [IV-WC]

2713 - INTRODUCTION TO BLACK LITERATURE IN THE UNITED STATES. Prerequisite: 1213 or equivalent. An introduction to Black writing produced in the United States. Introduces students to important texts and their major concerns. Attention is given to the struggle between literature that criticizes racial injustice and literature that celebrates Black cultural identity. (Irreg.)

2733 - AMERICAN INDIAN LITERATURE: EARLY AND TRADITIONAL. Prerequisite: 1113, 1213 and one course in American literature, history or anthropology. A study of earliest forms of American Indian expression in the oral tradition and beginnings of its literature as written in English up to 1945. Special emphasis on understanding particular tribal world-views in order to appreciate the literature and problems inherent in translating from native languages. (Irreg.)

2743 - AMERICAN INDIAN LITERATURE: MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY. Prerequisite: 1113, 1213 and one course in American literature or history. Features the literature of American Indians written since 1945. Attention is directed to early writers such as Will Rogers and D'Arcy McNickle and to the recent renaissance of contemporary Indian writings by N. Scott Momaday, Leslie Marmon Silko, James Welch and others. (Irreg.)

2773 - AMERICAN LITERATURE. A survey of major American writers and literary movements from the colonial period to the Civil War. (F) [IV-WC]

2883 - AMERICAN LITERATURE. A survey of major American writers and literary movements from the Civil War to present. (Sp) [IV-WC]

2970 - SPECIAL TOPICS. 1 to 3 hours. May be repeated; Maximum credit nine hours. Special topics course for content not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. May include library and/or laboratory research, and field projects. (Irreg.) 3013 200710 Interdisciplinary Approaches to Literature May be repeated with change of subject matter; maximum credit six hours. The study of two or more disciplines, focusing on a narrow historical period, a single major author and other discipline, or a circumscribed topic. (Irreg.)

3000-LEVEL COURSES

3023 - THEMATIC APPROACHES TO LITERATURE II. May be repeated with change of subject matter; maximum credit six hours. Close study of a major theme or preoccupation of a literary period in important works of the period. Attention to the relationship of the theme to relevant philosophical, sociological, political, religious and/or scientific thought. (Irreg.)

3033 - BRITISH WOMEN WRITERS. A study of themes, literary traditions, and reception of works by British women writers from one or several periods. Considers relevant issues of female authorship, socio-historical contexts, generic conventions and feminist theory. (Irreg.)

3043 - TWENTIETH-CENTURY BRITISH WOMEN NOVELISTS. Prerequisite: 1213. Introduces students to some of the major Twentieth century English and Scottish women novelists, and to the regional, social and cultural contexts of their work. (Irreg .)

3103 - TOPICS IN ADVANCED COMPOSITION. Prerequisite: twelve hours of English, application and departmental permission. May be repeated with change of subject matter; maximum credit six hours. Practice in writing with emphasis on style and strategies of composition. Focus varies: practice in various literary genres; study of rhetoric, practice in various modes; argumentative writing; advanced expository writing. (Irreg.) [I-ENGL]

3113 - NATURE/ENVIRONMENT/SCIENCE WRITING. Prerequisite: 1213 or EXPO 1213, application and departmental permission. Interdisciplinary advanced composition course offers students a chance to read and write about the natural world, the environment, and science and technology. Centered on the mode of writing called "creative non-fiction," students will write a spectrum of autobiographical essays to more "objective" reportorial pieces. This is a designated writing course. (Irreg.) [IV-WC]

3123 - FICTION WRITING. Prerequisite: 2123, application and departmental permission. Intensive writing of short stories, with class attention to writing process, style, technique, revision and contemporary developments in the genre. (Irreg.)

3133 - POETRY WRITING. Prerequisite: 2123, application and departmental permission. Conducted in workshop format; emphasizes the preparation of a coherent, chapbook-length manuscript of poems. Students are also required to formulate a personal poetics and to complete selected exercises in translation or adaptation. (Irreg.)

3143 - STUDIES IN LITERACY AND RHETORIC. Prerequisite: 1213 or EXPO 1213, application and departmental permission. Introduces students to current and historical knowledge about literacy and rhetoric and their places in modern society. Students also explore the forces (political, economic, racial, cultural) that shape the way literacy and rhetoric function in society. (Irreg.) [IV-WC]

3153 - TECHNICAL WRITING. Prerequisite: 1213 and Engineering or hard science majors only. For students of the pure and applied sciences. Focuses on the forms of report writing most frequently encountered in research and industry. (F, Sp, Su)

3163 - WRITING, RHETORIC, AND HISTORIES OF TECHNOLOGY. Prerequisite: twelve hours of English, application and departmental permission. An advanced writing course for any major that focuses on the relationship between current and historical technological change and students' writing practices. Workshop format privileges student writing and redrafting while concurrently studying selected histories of Western rhetoric. (Irreg.)

3173 - HISTORIES OF WRITING, RHETORIC AND TECHNOLOGY. Prerequisite: twelve hours of English, application and departmental permission. Investigates how computers and other digital technologies have changed the ways we write and think. How video and television have changes the ways we write and think; and how aspects of the history of written communication, visual rhetoric, and other forces change the ways we write and think. (Irreg.)

3183 - AUTHORING IN THE INFORMATION AGE. Prerequisite: 1213, application and departmental permission. Covers authoring information in traditional paper documents, Power Point presentations, and web sites with emphasis on delivery, arrangement/architecture, and design for communicating through language and graphics. Topics include the impact of rhetoric contexts, accessibility and retrieval of information, and usability testing. (Irreg.)

3193 - WORKING WITH WRITERS. Prerequisite: 1213 or EXPO 1213. Students will investigate how texts are produced, revised, and edited, with a focus on response and feedback strategies that help writers improve. Course will allow students to practice strategies to improve writing and learn how to work with other writers. (Irreg.)

3213 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN FICTION. May be repeated with change of subject matter; maximum credit six hours. Presents a fictional type or problem in fiction for extensive study within a specified historical period: works by a single author in a special genre (e.g., Henry James' fantastic stories), works by several authors in a genre (e.g., violence in post-World War II novels), topics such as myth in a period of fiction and the consideration of recent developments in novel writing. (Irreg.)

3223 - OKLAHOMA WRITERS/WRITING OKLAHOMA. Prerequisite: 1213 or EXPO 1213, application and departmental permission. An introduction to regional writing about Oklahoma. Focus on Oklahoma culture as a source of literature, and the creative work of course participants. (Irreg.) [IV-WC]

3233 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN DRAMA. May be repeated with change of subject matter; maximum credit six hours. A study of a particular literary aspect of drama. This may include the pursuit of a particular theme through several periods, or concentrate on a particular age or focus on the dramatic works of a single or related playwrights. (Irreg.)

3243 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN FILM. May be repeated with change of subject matter; maximum credit six hours. Sophisticated concerns involving film: the works of specific directors (Bergmann, Fellini, Kubrick, etc.); the relationship of film to literature; the writings of notable film theorists (Bazin, Eisenstein, etc.) or critics (Mast, Kael, Sarris). (Irreg.)

3253 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN AMERICAN INDIAN LITERATURE. May be repeated twice with change in subject matter. Explores a major literary or cultural aspect of American Indian literature such as the Five Civilized Tribes, Eastern Tribes, the Literature of Massacre, autobiographical writing, fiction and poetry. (Irreg.)

3263 - WOMEN AND FILM. Prerequisite: 1213. Focus on the representation of women on screen and the role of women behind the camera from the late 19th century through the present day. Readings will include major essays in feminist theory including sociological, psychoanalytic, semiological, and cultural approaches. (Irreg.)

3273 - COMIC THEORY AND COMIC PRACTICE THROUGH FILM. Prerequisite: 1213. Through readings in comic theory and film, an examination of the comic response to life, celebrating our capacity to endure rather than to aspire and suffer. Forms of comedy to be examined include satire, black humor, farce, romantic comedy, festive comedy, comedy of manners, burlesque, the carnivalesque, and women's laughter. (Irreg.)

3283 - TRIBALLY SPECIFIC APPROACHES TO NATIVE AMERICAN LITERATURES.
Prerequisite: 1213. May be repeated once with change of content; maximum credit six hours. Literary oeuvre of a single American Indian tribe or examines the aesthetics of tribal nationalism as they apply to native-authored literary works. (Irreg.)

3293 - TECHNO THRILLERS/CYBER-PUNK. Prerequisite: ENGL 1213 or EXPO 1213. Topics include the machine as Messiah, fighting back against nature, weapons invoking terror, speculations about the future, emergent nanotechnologies, war fantasies and myths becoming reality, salvation through ecology. The readings blend contrasting subjects-inventive new vocabularies and antique languages, wilderness and technology, religious and secular regimes before and after an apocalypse, masculine and feminine skill sets, patterns in engineering/ science/ grammar, experimental and traditional solutions for living well and finding paradise on earth or elsewhere. (F, Sp) [IV-WC]

3333 - LITERATURE AND PSYCHOLOGICAL CRITICISM. Using the methods of discursive analysis, examines the cultural situation in which particular psychological perspectives emerge in relation to experience and understanding, with an emphasis on the psychological schools appearing in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Explore the assumptions central to a psychological theory and the characteristic language in which it is set forth. Content may include the application of one or more psychological perspectives (theories) to the understanding of both literary works and or cultural phenomena in general. (Irreg.)

3343 - THE LITERATURE OF EMPIRE. Survey of literary and nonliterary discourse about and relating to European colonies since the Renaissance. Study of colonial and postcolonial fiction, poetry, drama and criticism from Asia, Africa, the Americas, Australasia and Europe, concentrating on English-language sources. (Irreg.)

3353 - AMERICAN INDIAN NONFICTION WRITING. Examines the various forms of recorded oratory, nonfiction writing by American Indians. Includes autobiography, political and social writing, newspaper reportage, philosophy, anthropological and historical writings, humor and other kinds of writings by early and present-day American Indians. (Irreg.)

3363 - FILMS AND CONTEXT. Explores film within a particular period or milieu. Attention is given to production styles, prominent actors and studio influence within a definable setting such as American films in the 1930s. (Irreg.)

3383 - POLITICS AND LITERATURE. Explore political theories of literature as well as political contexts and functions of literary works. May focus on a politically well-defined period, one or more specifically political genres, politics of particular literary movements, or on individual authors. (Irreg.)

3403 - THE GRAPHIC NOVEL. A study of the works of Spiegelman, Pekar, Moore/Gibbons, Gaiman/Mckean, Crumb and other graphic novel authors. Comparison with prose fictions having a strong visual element and possibly with films. (Irreg.) [IV-AF]

3423 - FILM AND OTHER EXPRESSIVE FORMS. Examines from practical and theoretical perspectives the relationship between film and another area of creative expression such as the novel, theatre, painting and photography. (Irreg.)

3433 - FOUNDATIONS OF INDIC CULTURE AND CIVILIZATION. Introduction to central religious, philosophical and literary writings of India from the "Rg Veda" through "Bhagavad Gita." (Irreg.) [IV-NW]

3453 - AFRO-CARIBBEAN LIT/CULTURAL CONSCIOUSNESS. FROM ALIENATION TO VOICE.
Prerequisite: 1213. Explores select Afro-Caribbean writings by male and female writers through the historical and cultural influences that have shaped the production of this literature. Attention will be given to the literary style of the writers who represent various aspects of Caribbean experience. (Irreg.)

3463 - AMERICAN FICTION. Prerequisite: 1213. Historical survey of major American fiction, both novels and shorter fictional forms, from the Federal period to the present. Special attention is given to the uniqueness and diversity of themes and forms during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries when fiction came to dominate American literary production and consumption. (Irreg.) [IV-WC]

3483 - NATIVE AMERICAN WRITERS. Prerequisite: 1213. May be repeated once with change of content; maximum credit six hours. Investigates the ways native American writers reflect their cultural histories and thought systems through their writing. By focusing on the emergence of native literature over the past three decades or on native writers of Oklahoma, students will learn how native traditions have been translated into literature. (Irreg.) [IV-NW]

3503 - EPIC. Prerequisite: ENGL 1213 or EXPO 1213. Analyze and compare selected classical and Renaissance epic poems. Authors may include Homer, Vergil, Lucan, Ovid, Dante, Tasso, Ariosto, Spenser, Milton, and others. Attention to generic form, literary themes, and cultural/historical contexts. Works read in English or English translation. (Irreg.) [IV-WC]

3513 - MEDIEVAL ENGLISH LITERATURE. Intensive study of some of the major literary works of medieval England with attention to the relation between the literature and its social, intellectual and cultural contexts. Readings in various genres will include such works as Gawain and the Green Knight, Everyman, Piers Plowman, Morte d'Arthur, and The Canterbury Tales. (Irreg.) [IV-WC]

3523 - SIXTEENTH-CENTURY ENGLISH LITERATURE. Intensive study of some of the major literary works of sixteenth-century England with attention to the relation between the literature and its social, intellectual and cultural contexts. Readings will include works in various genres by such writers as Spenser, Sidney, Shakespeare, Marlowe, More. (Irreg.)

3533 - SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY ENGLISH LITERATURE. Intensive study of some of the major literary works of seventeenth-century England with attention to the relation between the literature and its social, intellectual and cultural contexts. Readings will include works in various genres by such writers as Donne, Herbert, Milton, Marvell, Bacon, Jonson and Webster. (Irreg.) [IV-WC]

3543 - BRITISH-AMERICAN ENLIGHTENMENT LITERATURE. Prerequisite: 1213 or EXPO 1213. Study of peculiarly British and American Enlightenment concerns, and of how they were expressed and reexamined in British and American Literary texts. (Irreg.) [IV-WC]

3553 - TRANSATLANTIC LITERATURE. Prerequisite: 1213 and 2313. Explores links between British and American Literature and culture from the seventeenth to the nineteenth centuries. Themes include migration and the sea, issues of servitude, letter writing, interlocking uses of print, pen and voice to fashion local and transatlantic family, social, economics and political identities. (Irreg.)

3573 - ARTHURIAN LEGEND AND LITERATURE. Crosslisted with MLLL 3573. Examination of the legend of King Arthur in European literature. Concentrate on the historical Arthur, followed by major portion of semester on medieval and modern literary texts concerning Arthur and the Round Table. All texts read in English. (Irreg.) [IV-WC]

3613 - NINETEENTH-CENTURY ENGLISH LITERATURE. Intensive study of the major literary works of nineteenth-century English-the Romantic and Victorian periods-with attention to the relation between literature and its social, intellectual and cultural contexts. Readings will include work in various genres by such writers as Wordsworth, Austen, Dickens, Browning, Eliot, Carlyle and others. (Irreg.) [IV-WC]

3623 - TWENTIETH-CENTURY ENGLISH LITERATURE. Intensive study of some of the major literary works of twentieth-century England with attention to the relation between the literature and its social, intellectual and cultural contexts. Readings will include works in various genres by such writers as Conrad, Yeats, Eliot, Joyce, Woolf, Synge, Shaw, Auden, Waugh, Ford, etc. (Irreg.) [IV-WC]

3643 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN NON-WESTERN LITERATURE AND CULTURE. Prerequisite: 1213. Examines a broad range of potential topics, including particular practices in the context of global cultures and/or minority groups in the West. Course readings draw on a variety of critical or theoretical work regarding culture, discourse, history, or institutions. (Irreg.)

3653 - THE BIBLE AS LITERATURE. Interpreting the Bible as literature. Although much class time will be spent developing readings of individual books, a number of critical issues that affect the ways to approach the project of understanding the Bible will also be considered. (Irreg.)

3713 - INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN STUDIES. An introduction to the main currents in American thought as exemplified by literary and nonliterary works (emphasis on the latter). Readings may include works from history, philosophy, art, science and other areas. (Irreg.) [IV-WC]

3813 - SCIENCE FICTION. Prerequisite: 1213. An introduction to a major genre of popular culture. Focuses on the philosophical, social, and creative values of science as a central constituent of modern life. Students explore the social, moral, and political issues at stake in science fiction's critique and occasional celebration of scientific culture. (Irreg.) [IV-WC]

3833 - INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN DRAMA. Prerequisite: 1213. A survey of major American plays and playwrights, dramatic theory and the theatrical institutions that supported and disseminated them from the Federal period to the present. Special emphasis on the changing social context of the theater. (Irreg.) [IV-WC]

3843 - THEORY NOW. Prerequisite: ENGL 1213 and ENGL 2273. In this course undergraduate English majors and minors study new directions in literary and cultural criticism and theory since 1968, reading influential selections from roughly two dozen leading postmodern figures. The main schools and movements discussed are structuralism, poststructuralism, feminist theory, postcolonial criticism, race and ethnicity studies, and cultural studies. Representative figures include Roland Barthes, Harold Bloom, Helene Cixous, Michel Foucault, bell hooks, and Elaine Showalter. Among the key concepts and terms explored are authorship, convention, literary canon, ideology, interpretation, intertextuality, hegemony, literariness, and tradition. (F, Sp)

3960 - HONORS READING. 1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: admission to Honors Program. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Will consist of topics designated by the instructor in keeping with the student's major program. The topics will cover materials not usually presented in the regular classes. (Irreg.)

3980 - HONORS RESEARCH. 1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: admission to Honors Program. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Will provide an opportunity for the gifted Honors candidate to work at a special project in the student's field. (Irreg.)

3990 - INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: permission of instructor and junior standing. May be repeated once with change of content. Independent study may be arranged to study a subject not available through regular course offerings. (F, Sp, Su)

3999 - UPPER DIVISION TRANSFER CREDIT. This is not a course offered at the University of Oklahoma. It is used to denote upper division transfer credit for which there is no OU equivalent course.

4000-LEVEL COURSES

4003 - MOVEMENTS IN WORLD LITERATURE. Crosslisted with MLLL 4003. Prerequisite: junior standing. May be repeated with change of subject matter; maximum credit nine hours. Focuses on texts within a literary movement (literature other than canonical American or British). Also attention to critical and theoretical questions about concepts such as genre, nation, national building, national identity, etc. (Irreg.) [IV-WC]

4013 - MAJOR FIGURE (WITH SUBTITLE). May be repeated with change of subject matter; maximum credit six hours. The major figure designated in the subtitle is studied in depth: a major portion of his/her works are covered; significant critical approaches will be presented. (Irreg.)

4023 -  LITERARY MOVEMENTS. May be repeated with change of subject matter; maximum credit six hours. A course on literary movements or groups of authors who are related through their particular interests in certain distinct or philosophical ideas: the Metaphysical Poets, the Fugitive Writers, etc. (Irreg.)

4033 - INDIGENOUS POLITICAL WRITING. Prerequisite: 2733 or 2743 or permission of the instructor. Examines key issues of American Indian politics and literature, exploring how they continue to shape the American Indian world in the present. Also considers how North American Indian politics relate to broader discussions of indigenous peoples and literatures around the world. (Irreg.)

4113 - MAGAZINE EDITING AND PUBLISHING IN THE HUMANITIES. Prerequisite: 1213 or EXPO 1213. Introduction to magazine writing, editing, and publishing scholarly and otherwise in the humanities. (F)

4133 - HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE. Traces the development of the English language from its Indo-European origins through its present state. Special attention will be paid to changes in grammar and vocabulary. (Irreg.)

4203 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN LITERARY FORMS. May be repeated with change of subject matter; maximum credit six hours. Generic approach to literary forms; exact subject material (eighteenth-century satire, Western novel, gothic fiction) will vary from course to course. (Irreg.)

4233 - MAJOR FIGURES IN THEORY. Intensive exploration of the work and influence of one or a small number of literary or cultural theorists. Texts typically will encompass primary reading in a theorist or group of theorists and ancillary readings in the work of writers or other theorists who show the theorist(s). (Irreg.)

4243 - ISSUES IN CULTURAL STUDIES. Prerequisite: 1113, 1213. Isolate significant issues in the theoretical working out and practice of cultural studies, using the methods of discursive analysis. focus on recent attempts in the humanities to define culture, formulate post-colonial critiques of culture, and other such issues in feminism and cultural theory that are part of the working out of discourses about culture and society. (Irreg.)

4253 - INTRODUCTION TO FILM THEORY. Introduction to basic issues of film theory as seen by classical and contemporary film theorists. (Irreg.)

4263 - CONTEMPORARY FEMINIST THEORY. Prerequisite: 1113, 1213. Identify diverse ways that feminist scholars define culture and identify the variety of political and theoretical preoccupations of feminist cultural studies. Work toward an understanding of contemporary feminism as an inherently cultural formation. (Irreg.)

4273 - WOMEN WRITERS. Prerequisite: 1213. May be repeated twice with change of content; maximum credit nine hours. A study of women's writings from one or several periods. Approach may be thematic, generic, regional, historical, etc., and will incorporate critical approaches including feminist theory and criticism. (Irreg.)

4283 - HIP HOP AS POETRY, LITERATURE, AND CULTURAL EXPRESSION. Prerequisite: 1213. Hip Hop will be examined from three different angles: the message, the history, and the performance. There are required film viewings. Students will analyze the lyrics of literary texts and music albums, and will be required to write, memorize and perform their own poetry. (Irreg.) [IV-AF]

4293 - CARNIVAL LITERATURE. Prerequisite: 1213 or EXPO 1213. Examines historical, cultural and political aspects of carnival celebrations in Europe, the Caribbean, and South America. Through theoretical texts, histories, novels, films, music and performance we trace the subversive and liberatory power of carnival. (Irreg.)

4303 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN CRITICISM. May be repeated with change of subject matter; maximum credit six hours. selected studies in literary criticism, including the criticism of film. The exact subject matter will vary from instructor to instructor. (Irreg.)

4323 - THE HARLEM RENAISSANCE. Prerequisite: 1213. Examines the literature, culture, and politics of the Harlem renaissance. In addition to texts of the 1920s, the course considers the contexts out of which the movement emerged, as well as its effects in the U.S. and abroad. (Irreg.)

4333 - BLACK ARTS/BLACK POWER. Prerequisite: 1213 or EXPO 1213. Examines the formation of the black arts and black power movements of the 1960s and 1970s in the united states. Focus on cultural exchanges and ideological engagements between local struggles for civil rights and larger global movements. Studies include a variety of literary and critical texts and genres, film and music. (Irreg.)

4343 - THE INDIAN IN AMERICAN POPULAR CULTURE. Prerequisite: 1213 or equivalent. Explores the various appearances and roles, stereotyped or otherwise, American Indians have traditionally been pigeon-holed into throughout America's five centuries of recorded history. Covers Captain John Smith, Colonial era, Romantic period of Cooper and Longfellow, and modern writers Waters and Berger. (Irreg.) [IV-NW]

4373 -BLACK LITERARY FORM AND CULTURAL EXPRESSION. Prerequisite: 1213. Compare and contrast the relationship between literary form and cultural expression by analyzing Black literature produced in two different contexts: the United States and the Caribbean. Examine writing from the literary movements knows as the "Harlem Renaissance," "Negritude," and the "Black Arts." (Irreg.)

4383 - CIVILIZATION AND DIASPORA. Prerequisite: 1213. Examines literary and cultural forms from the African Diaspora (the Black population outside of continental Africa) offering alternative definitions of civilization, literary and progress. Define and explore what is called Diaspora literacy: linguistic, philosophical and cultural ways of knowing that come out of African Diaspora experience. (Irreg.) [IV-NW]

4403 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN COMPARATIVE LITERATURE. May be repeated with change of subject matter; maximum credit six hours. Topics will vary. Literature studied may include combinations of foreign (In Translation) and English and/or American literature. Instructor's approach may be thematic, regional, historical, generic, etc., but the course will include intensive cross-cultural explorations of literature. (Irreg.)

4433 - MODERN BRITISH AND EUROPEAN DRAMA. A survey of British and European drama from Ibsen and Shaw to the present day. (Irreg.) 4443 200710 Contemporary Literature Intensive study of major literary works since World War II in English, American and outside the Anglo-American tradition. Readings will include works in various genres by such writers as Barthelme, Fowles, Marquez, Larkin, Merrill, Solzhenitsyn, Grass, Sartre, etc. (Irreg.)

4453 - LITERATURE AND LANDSCAPE. Exploration of writers, gardeners, farmers and painters who translated nature into art. Texts range from ancient to modern world and may include classical, renaissance, romantic and American works in which engagement in landscape is an important topic. (Irreg.)

4463 - LINGUISTICS AND SEMIOTICS. Trace the study of synchronic linguistics in phonology, syntactics and semiotics in the twentieth century and examine the field of semiotics based on this development. (Irreg.)

4503 - BACKGROUNDS OF THE RENAISSANCE. Prerequisite: 1213. A study of classical and continental authors esteemed in the English Renaissance. Focus on Homer, Virgil, Ovid, Petrarch, Erasmus, and Machiavelli in the contexts of their cultures as well as their contributions to culture. (Irreg.) [IV-WC]

4513 - CHAUCER. Examines the poetry of The Canterbury Tales and one or two of Chaucer's earlier narrative poems. Special emphasis will be given to the social, literary and cultural backgrounds to Chaucer's work. (Irreg.)

4523 - SHAKESPEARE COMEDIES. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing. Close reading and analysis of Shakespeare's comedies and histories. Selected criticism, 1600 to the present. Historical background and Shakespeare's theatre. Dramatic traditions, movie interpretations, performance theory and acting. Emphases and reading lists vary from year to year. (Irreg.) [IV-WC]

4533 - SHAKESPEARE TRAGEDIES. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing. Close reading and analysis of Shakespeare's tradegies and lyric poetry. Selected criticism, 1600 to the present. Historical background and Shakespeare's theatre. Dramatic traditions, movie interpretations, performance theory and acting. Emphases and reading lists vary from year to year. (Irreg.) [IV-WC]

4543 - TUDOR AND STUART DRAMA. Intensive study of the drama of Shakespeare's contemporaries, with emphasis on the plays of Christopher Marlowe and Ben Jonson. Attention to dramatic forms, social issues, cultural context, language and performance. Readings will include plays by Marlowe, Jonson, Webster, Heywood, Fletcher, Ford. (Irreg.)

4553 - MILTON. Close reading and analysis of selected poetry and prose, with emphasis on Paradise Lost. Study of literary forms, cultural myths, theology, ethics. Themes of loss, guilt, free will, male-female relationships. (Irreg.)

4573 - EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY ENGLISH NOVEL. Sources, early reputation and emerging critical theories; economic, moral, feminine influences; realistic, psychological, sentimental, gothic and satiric directions; technical developments in structure and point of view; works by such novelists as Richardson, Fielding, Smollett, Sterne and Jane Austen. (Irreg.)

4593 - TOPICS IN MEDIEVAL LITERATURE AND CULTURE. Prerequisite: 1213. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit six hours. Specialized study in selected topics in medieval literary culture. Students will be expected to be able to read middle English. (Irreg.)

4603 - TOPICS IN EARLY MODERN LITERATURE AND CULTURE. Prerequisite: 1213. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit six hours. Specialized study in selected topics in early modern literary culture. (Irreg.)

4613 - NINETEENTH-CENTURY ENGLISH NOVEL. Historical and aesthetic study of the novel in relation to main developments in English literary history during the period. Emphasis, however, is on the intrinsic literary values in the novels read. (Irreg.) [IV-WC]

4623 - ENGLISH ROMANTIC POETRY. Prerequisite: 1213 or equivalent. May be repeated once with change of content; maximum credit six hours. Intensive study of the most important poems and criticism of early Romantic poets and later Romantic poets. (Irreg.)

4653 - TWENTIETH-CENTURY ENGLISH POETRY. A survey with emphasis on Yeats, Pound, Eliot, Lawrence, Graves, Auden and Dylan Thomas. (Irreg.)

4713 - MAJOR AUTHORS IN NINETEENTH-CENTURY AMERICAN LITERATURE. Prerequisite: 1213. May be repeated with change of subject; maximum credit six hours. Intensive study of one or more major 19th century American authors such as James Fenimore Cooper, Catharine Maria Sedgwick, Frederick Douglass, Walt Whitman, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Emily Dickinson, or Mark Twain. (Irreg.)

4723 - ISSUES IN NINETEENTH-CENTURY AMERICAN LITERATURE. Prerequisite: 1213. May be repeated with change of subject; maximum credit six hours. Intensive study of nineteenth-century American texts in a specific literary or historical context, such as the Civil War and reconstruction, the Women's Rights Movement, transcendentalism, regionalism, or sentimentalism. (Irreg.)

4733 - AMERICAN NATURALISM AND REALISM. Major American novelists from the Civil War to the end of World War I, including Howells, James, Twain, Crane, Dreiser, Norris and Wharton. (Irreg.)

4813 - AMERICAN DRAMA. An examination of representative American plays ranging from naturalistic tragedy to farce. Emphasis is on the period since 1918. (Irreg.)

4823 - AMERICAN NOVEL SINCE 1920. Major authors and schools in American fiction including Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner, Steinbeck and others selected by the instructor. (Irreg.)

4833 - TWENTIETH-CENTURY AMERICAN POETRY. A survey from Frost to the present with emphasis on major figures in each of three generations. (Irreg.)

4853 - THE ENGLISH CAPSTONE COURSE. Prerequisite: 1113, 1213, and 2433 and 2443 or 2543 and 2653 or 2773 and 2883, plus twelve hours. Combine English majors from diverse tracks to work on a topic involving major cultural issues, artifacts and texts. Projects include a significant amount of writing demonstrating the students' accomplishments in analyzing literature. (F, Sp) [V]

4883 - LITERATURE OF THE DIASPORA. Prerequisite: ENGL 1213 and permission of instructor. May be repeated with a change of content, maximum credit nine hours. In-depth study of selected contemporary international writers/jurors, frequently non-Western, who visit campus as part of the Neustadt and/or Puterbaugh symposia for World Literature Today. (irreg.)

4923 - ADVANCED FICTION WRITING. Slashlisted with 5923. Prerequisite: six hours of creative writing, application and departmental permission. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Work at an advanced level for qualified students. Intensive writing, peer criticism, revision, and reading in current markets with the goal of producing publishable work. No student may earn credit for both 4923 and 5923. (Irreg.)

4933 - ADVANCED POETRY WRITING. Slashlisted with 5933. Prerequisite: six hours of creative, application and departmental permission. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Intensive writing, peer criticism, revision, and reading in current markets with the goal of producing publishable work. No student may earn credit for both 4933 and 5933. (Irreg.)

4943 - ADVANCED CREATIVE NONFICTION WRITING. Slashlisted with 5943. Prerequisite: six hours of 2000-3000-level writing courses, application and departmental permission. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Intensive writing, peer criticism, revision, and reading in current markets with the goal of producing publishable creative nonfiction. No student may earn credit for both 4943 and 5943. (Irreg.)

4950 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN WORLD LITERATURE TODAY. 1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: 1213 and permission of instructor. May be repeated with a change of topic, maximum credit six hours. In-depth study of selected contemporary international writers/jurors who visit campus as part of the Neustadt and/or Puterbaugh symposiums for World Literature Today. (Irreg.)

4960 - DIRECTED READINGS. 1 to 4 hours. Prerequisite: good standing in University; permission of instructor and dean. May be repeated; maximum credit four hours. Designed for upper-division students who need opportunity to study a specific problem in greater depth than formal course content permits. (Irreg.)

4970 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN WORLD LITERATURE TODAY. Today 1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: 1213 and permission of instructor. May be repeated with a change of topic; maximium credit six hours. In-depth study of selected contemporary international writers/jurors who visit campus as part of the Neustadt and/or Puterbaugh symposiums of World Literature Today. (Irreg.)

4990 - INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: three courses in general area to be studied; permission of instructor and department. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Contracted independent study for topics not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. Independent study may include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (F, Sp, Su)

5000-LEVEL COURSES

5003 - SEMINAR: SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENGLISH, AMERICAN, OR COMPARATIVE LITERATURE.
Prerequisite: graduate standing and permission of department. May be repeated three times with change of subject matter; maximum credit 12 hours. Topics in theoretical and historical problems of English, American or comparative literature in different periods. (Irreg.)

5113 - TEACHING COLLEGE COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE. Prerequisite: graduate standing and permission of department. In a workshop format, students will apply readings in composition and literary theory to such practical concerns of freshman English teaching as course planning, assignment preparation, grading and discussion techniques. (F)

5133 - TEACHING TECHNICAL WRITING. Prerequisite: graduate standing and permission of department. Introducution to the types of writing professional engineers and scientists are expected to do and methods of teaching these forms of writing. In addition, students will attend classes being taught by the professor and have the opportunity to design and teach some workshops as well as evaluate the undergraduates' work. (Irreg.)

5223 - SEMINAR: FILM. Prerequisite: graduate standing and permission of department. Will involve reading and analyzing the works of the more sophisticated film theorists and critics as well as studying approaches to the teaching of film (the auteur theory; film history; film genres; visual literacy; film and society; film as narrative; non-narrative forms). (Irreg.)

5253 - TRANSATLANTIC WOMEN WRITERS. Prerequisite: graduate standing and permission of department. Explores work of eighteenth and early nineteenth century women writers who were "transatlantic" in different ways: some were born and/or lived in America and published in England; some wrote novels which crossed the Atlantic or were set on both sides; some corresponded and wrote in tandem. (Irreg.)

5263 - BRITISH WOMEN WRITERS. Prerequisite: graduate standing and permission of department. May be repeated twice with change of content; maximum credit nine hours. Study of British women writers with focus on any period from the Middle Ages to the present. May focus on a particular genre, a literary movement, or on a particular author. (Irreg.)

5273 - ANGLOPHONE WOMEN WRITERS. Prerequisite: graduate standing and permission of department. May be repeated once with a change of content; maximum credit six hours. Close examination of Anglophone women's writing regarding the sociopolitical forces that shape their historical experience, identity, and cultural roles. Novels will be from different regions and with distinct preoccupations. (Irreg.)

5283 - AMERICAN WOMEN WRITERS. Prerequisite: graduate standing and permission of department. May be repeated twice with change of content; maximum credit nine hours. Specific topics will vary. Focus on the history of writing by and about women in the United States. (Irreg.)

5313 - LITERARY CRITICISM. Prerequisite: graduate standing and department permission. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit nine hours. A comprehensive history of literary criticism, the study of a particular movement or related movements in literary criticism; or a study of a particular issue or related issues in literary criticism. (Sp)

5323 - CONTEMPORARY CULTURAL STUDIES. Prerequisite: graduate standing and permission of department. May be repeated once with change of topic; maximum credit six hours. Addresses variable topics and issues in cultural studies such as popular culture, mass media, subcultures, gender codes, visual media, minority literatures, global cultural, and post-modernization. (Irreg.)

5333 - NATIVE AMERICAN WOMEN WRITERS. Prerequisite: graduate standing and permission of department. Reading or viewing poetry, fiction, autobiography, and film by Native American women. Examining traditional Indian societies' conceptions of gender and the relationship between western Feminism and native women's political experiences. (Irreg.)

5343 - NATIVE AMERICAN FICTION. Prerequisite: graduate standing and permission of department. May be repeated twice with change of subject matter; maximum credit nine hours. Study of fiction written by Native American authors in the nineteenth and twentieth century. The course may include native authors from throughout the Americas and study the cultural contexts of Native American fiction. This course may also focus on particular themes and authors. (Irreg.)

5353 - NATIVE AMERICAN POETRY. Prerequisite: graduate standing and permission of department. May be repeated twice with change of content; maximum credit nine hours. Study of poetry written by Native American authors in twentieth century. Course may include native authors from throughout the Americas (including poetry in indigenous languages) and study the cultural contexts of Native American poetry. This course may also focus on particular themes and authors. (Irreg.)

5363 - NATIVE AMERICAN NON-FICTION AND CRITICISM. Prerequisite: graduate standing and permission of department. May be repeated twice with change of subject matter; maximum credit nine hours. Study of Native American cultures by means of non-fiction and scholarly-critical writings. Course may focus on issues of methodology, theory, and cultural studies. Course may also focus on particular themes and authors. (Irreg.)

5373 - GRADUATE TOPICS IN NATIVE AMERICAN LITERATURE. Prerequisite: graduate standing and permission of department. May be repeated up to three times with change of subject matter; maximum credit twelve hours. Special topics focusing on Native American cultures, including literature, drama, philosophy, and thematic approaches to the subject. Course may also focus on particular themes, movements, and authors. (Irreg.)

5403 - ISSUES IN COMPOSITION, RHETORIC, AND LITERACY. Prerequisite: graduate standing and permission of department. An overview of contemporary research and theory in the study of written composition, with emphasis on rhetorical theory, the interrelationship of writing and reading, and the politics of defining literacy. (Irreg.)

5413 - HISTORY OF MODERN COMPOSITION STUDIES. Prerequisite: graduate standing and permission of department. A survey of twentieth century scholarship on composition theory, including composing process theory and discourse theory. (Irreg.)

5423 - CLASSICAL RHETORICAL THEORY. Prerequisite: graduate standing and permission of department. Historicizing of rhetoric from ancient Egyptians to Greek sophists, Plato, Aristotle to Rome and Augustine. Includes examination of the ways "history" and cultural studies comprise the area. (Irreg.)

5433 - 18TH- AND 19TH-CENTURY RHETORICAL THEORY. Prerequisite: graduate standing and permission of department. An introduction to the rhetorical thought of eighteenth and nineteenth-century Britain and America, focusing on the development of rhetorical theories within the contexts of (1) eighteenth-century Scottish moral philosophy, (2) English romanticism, and (3) the emergence and development of higher education in nineteenth-century America. (Irreg.)

5443 - 20TH-CENTURY COMPOSITION AND RHETORIC THEORY. Prerequisite: graduate standing and permission of department. A survey of twentieth-century scholarship on rhetoric and composition theory, beginning with the rhetorical theories of Kenneth Burke, with emphasis on the mid-century revival of rhetoric and composition through current changes brought about by technology and feminism. (Irreg.)

5453 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN COMPOSITION, RHETORIC, AND LITERACY. Prerequisite: graduate standing and permission of department. May be repeated two times with change of content; maximum credit nine hours. Addresses topical issues being debated within the profession. (Irreg.)

5463 - RHETORIC AND TECHNOLOGY. Prerequisite: graduate standing and permission of department. May be repeated once with change of content; maximum credit six hours. A graduate seminar designed to explore the impact of computer technology on rhetorical theory. Examines electronic literacy in terms of the following themes: history and writing technologies; the politics of writing instruction in computer-mediated classrooms; rhetoric and issues of difference; and intellectual property in a computer age. (Irreg.)

5473 - WOMEN'S RHETORICS AND WRITING PRACTICES. Prerequisite: graduate standing and permission of department. Analysis of selected historical and current work by women according to histories and theories of written composition theory, rhetorical theory, and literacy practices. These issues are studied by analyzing how women interact with different forms of communication (e.g., speaking, print, film, video, computer graphics). (Irreg.)

5483 - RHETORICAL PERSPECTIVES ON LITERACY. Prerequisite: graduate standing and permission of department. Inquiry into the meaning of "literacy" in the electronic age where text, graphics, and video "interanimate" each other. It asks: what are the boundaries of literacy: What academic fields does its study encompass: What is the current benchmark for illiteracy: How have different societies defined functional literacy? (Irreg.)

5513 - MAJOR MEDIEVAL AUTHORS. Prerequisite: graduate standing and permission of department. May be repeated twice with a change of content; maximum credit nine hours. Topics vary. Focus on an outstanding medieval author such as Geoffrey Chaucer, Margery Kempe, or Thomas Malory, read in his or her literary, historical, and social context. (Irreg.)

5523 - TOPICS IN MEDIEVAL LITERATURE AND CULTURE. Prerequisite: graduate standing and permission of department. May be repeated twice with change of content; maximum credit nine hours. Topics vary. Special studies in major figures, genres, themes, and movements of the Middle Ages. (Irreg.)

5533 - MAJOR EARLY MODERN AUTHOR. Prerequisite: graduate standing and permission of department. May be repeated twice with change of content; maximum credit nine hours. Topics vary. Focus on a significant early modern author such as William Shakespeare, John Milton, or Margaret Cavendish, read in his or her literary, historical, and social context. (Irreg.)

5543 - TOPICS IN EARLY MODERN LITERATURE AND CULTURE. Prerequisite: graduate standing and permission of department. May be repeated twice with change of content; maximum credit nine hours. Topics vary. Special studies in major figures, genres, themes and movements of the early modern period. (Irreg.)

5553 - POST-COLONIAL THEORY AND WRITING. Prerequisite: graduate standing and permission of department. Theories of postcolonialism as they have emerged from poststructuralist theory in the west, and from various political-literary movements in the non-Western world. Also focuses on the literatures of postcolonial cultures in Asia, Africa, Latin American, the Caribbean, Australia, and North America. (Irreg.)

5613 - SEMINAR: NINETEENTH-CENTURY ENGLISH LITERATURE. Prerequisite: graduate standing and permission of department. May be repeated twice with change of subject matter; maximum credit nine hours. Special studies in the Romantic and Victorian periods designed to promote original research and criticism. (Irreg.)

5703 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN AMERICAN LITERATURE. Prerequisite: graduate standing and permission of department. May be repeated two times with change of subject matter; maximum credit 9 hours. Intensive study of a major theme, issue, genre or figure in American literature and culture that is not limited to any single historical period. (Irreg.)

5713 - SEMINAR: NINETEENTH-CENTURY AMERICAN LITERATURE. Prerequisite: graduate standing and permission of department. Specific topics will vary. Typical topics will be contemporary criticism and the literature of the American renaissance or contemporary criticism of the American realists. (Irreg.)

5723 - LATE NINETEENTH-CENTURY AND EARLY TWENTIETH-CENTURY AMERICAN LITERATURE. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of department. Examination of late nineteenth and early twentieth century fictional accounts of the relation between class and literary culture. Discussion includes writers' relation to literary market, writers' sense of the capacity of literature to transform society, and the writers' relation to nationalism, imperialism, and/or cosmopolitanism. Provides a broad survey of high and middlebrow literary culture in the U.S. at the turn of the century. (Irreg.)

5803 - SEMINAR: TWENTIETH-CENTURY AMERICAN LITERATURE. Prerequisite: graduate standing and permission of department. May be repeated twice with change of subject matter; maximum credit 9 hours. Topics vary. Special studies in American authors, ideas and literary types. (Irreg.)

5813 - BLACKNESS, COLONIALITY, GENDER. Prerequisite: graduate standing and permission of department. Taking an historical and cultural approach to Black U.S. and Caribbean female writing, explore the struggle between the "official" cultural contexts and the spaces of counter-cultural resistance. Analyze the terminology "colonial" and "postcolonial" and the current theoretical landscape in which these terms are used. (Irreg.)

5923 - ADVANCED FICTION WRITING. Slashlisted with 4923. Prerequisite: graduate standing, six hours of creative writing, application and departmental permission. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Work at an advanced level for qualified students. Intensive writing, peer criticism, revision, and reading in current markets with the goal of producing publishable work. No student may earn credit for both 4923 and 5923. (Irreg.)

5933 - ADVANCED POETRY WRITING. Slashlisted with 4933. Prerequisite: graduate standing, six hours of creative writing, application and departmental permission. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Intensive writing, peer criticism, revision, and reading in current markets with the goal of producing publishable work. No student may earn credit for both 4933 and 5933. (Irreg.)

5943 - ADVANCED CREATIVE NONFICTION WRITING. Slashlisted with 4943. Prerequisite: graduate standing, six hours of 2000-3000-level writing courses, application and departmental permissions. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Intensive writing, peer criticism, revision, and reading in current markets with the goal of producing publishable creative nonfiction. No student may earn credit for both 4943 and 5943. (Irreg.)

5960 - DIRECTED READINGS IN RESEARCH. 1 to 4 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing and permission of department. May be repeated with change of content; M.A. thesis option maximum credit three hours; M.A. non-thesis option maximum credit six hours; Ph.D. maximum credit nine hours. An individual course, which may not duplicate regular course offerings, of intensive research. Area and problem to be determined by student and directing professor. (Irreg.)

5970 - SPECIAL TOPICS/SEMINAR. 1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of department. May be repeated; maximum credit nine hours. Special topics or seminar course for content not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. May include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (Irreg.)

5980 - RESEARCH FOR MASTER'S THESIS. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of department. 2 to 9 hours. Variable enrollment; maximum credit applicable toward degree, six hours. (F, Sp, Su)

5999 - GRADUATE LEVEL TRANSFER CREDIT. This is not a course offered at the University of Oklahoma. It is used to denote graduate level transfer credit for which there is no OU equivalent course.

6000-LEVEL COURSES

6013 - RESEARCH SEMINAR IN COMPOSITION, RHETORIC, OR LITERACY. Prerequisite: graduate standing and permission of department. Topics vary. Issues of the historical/philosophical in composition and rhetorical studies; issues of empirical research in composition/rhetorical studies; issues of literacy in composition/rhetorical studies. (Irreg.)

6103 - RESEARCH METHODS IN COMPOSITION. Prerequisite: by permission. Topics vary. A survey of the literature in composition research from 1900 to the present; directed research of an empirical, historical or theoretical nature. (Irreg.)

6113 - ISSUES IN CONTEMPORARY THEORY AND CULTURAL STUDIES. Prerequisite: graduate standing and permission of department. Explores issues in theory and cultural studies during recent decades, focusing on influential figures, major texts, innovative schools and movements, and new problems in the field. (Irreg.)

6213 - RESEARCH SEMINAR ON WOMEN WRITERS. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. May be repeated twice with change of content; maximum credit nine hours. Detailed research on women writers and the contexts in which they write, as well as criticism and theory. (Irreg.)

6523 - SEMINAR IN THE RENAISSANCE. Prerequisite: graduate standing and permission of department. May be repeated once with change of subject matter; maximum credit six hours. Closely studies texts (e.g. More, Campion, Shakespeare, Milton) and topics (e.g. the Baroque, Colonialism, rhetoric) in English literature, 1485-1700. (Irreg.)

6960 - DIRECTED READINGS IN RESEARCH. 1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Directed readings and/or literature review under the direction of a faculty member. (Irreg.)

6970 - SPECIAL TOPICS/SEMINAR. 1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit 12 hours. Special topics or seminar course for content not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. May include library and/or research and field projects. (Irreg.)

6980 - RESEARCH FOR DOCTORAL DISSERTATION. (F, Sp, Su)

6990 - INDEPENDENT STUDY. 1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit nine hours. Contracted independent study for a topic not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. Independent study may include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (Irreg.)