Co-Directors

Paul Gilje is George Lynn Cross Research Professor of History at the University of Oklahoma.He is a leading scholar of the American Revolution and the early republic. He began his career as a social historian but has expanded his interests to include economic, political, and diplomatic history. This shift is apparent from some of his publications, especially his recent Free Trade and Sailors’ Rights in the War of 1812 (2013). Over the past decade he has introduced two courses of relevance to this Institute into his regular offerings: one on the diplomacy of the early republic from the Revolution to the Mexican War; and one on the development of the U.S. Constitution to the early nineteenth century. More...

Kevin Butterfield is Director of the Institute for the American Constitutional Heritage and Assistant Professor of Classics and Letters. He is a historian of the political and legal culture of the early American republic, completing his Ph.D. in History at Washington University in St. Louis before joining the core faculty of the IACH, where he has taught since 2010. He is the author of The Making of Tocqueville’s America: Law and Association in the Early United States (2015). More...



Core Faculty at the University of Oklahoma

Lindsay Robertson is Professor of Law at the University of Oklahoma and the director of the Center for the Study of American Indian Law and Policy. He has also served as Special Counsel on Indian Affairs to the Governor of Oklahoma from 2000 to 2010, and is currently a Special Justice on the Supreme Court of the Cheyenne-Arapaho Tribes. He also holds a Ph.D. in History from the University of Virginia and is the author of Conquest by Law: How the Discovery of America Dispossessed Indigenous Peoples of Their Lands (2005). More...




Visiting Faculty

Amy Greenberg is the Edwin Erle Sparks Professor of History at the Pennsylvania State University. She is a leading scholar in the study of the social, cultural, and political history of the United States, 1789-1865; gender history and constructions of masculinity; and American territorial expansionism. She is the author most recently of Manifest Manhood and the Antebellum American Empire (2005) and A Wicked War: Polk, Clay, Lincoln and the 1846 U.S. Invasion of Mexico (2012). More...


 

Peter Kastor is Professor of History and American Culture Studies at Washington University in St. Louis. He is currently the lead investigator of a book and Web-based project on “Creating a Federal Government, 1789-1829” and is the author of The Nation’s Crucible: The Louisiana Purchase and the Creation of America (2004) and William Clark’s World: Describing America in an Age of Unknowns (2011). More...


  


Peter Onuf is Thomas Jefferson Chair in History Emeritus at the University of Virginia and is a senior research fellow at the Robert H. Smith International Center for Jefferson Studies. He is the author of a number of important books on early national American history, including Statehood and Union: A History of the Northwest Ordinance (1987),Jefferson’s Empire: The Language of American Nationhood (2000), and The Mind of Thomas Jefferson (2007). More... 

     

 

Alan Taylor is the Thomas Jefferson Memorial Foundation Professor of History at the University of Virginia. He is a distinguished early American historian; the winner of the Pulitzer Prize for History (twice), the Bancroft Prize, and the National Book Award for Non-Fiction; and a leading figure and pioneer in the study of American history in its broadest geographic and multicultural contexts, including his bestselling work American Colonies: The Settling of North America (2001) and his current work-in-progress, American Revolutions. More...

 

Fay Yarbrough is Associate Professor of History at Rice University, where she teaches courses on nineteenth-century American history, including the “Nineteenth-Century Black Experience.” She is particularly interested in the interactions between indigenous peoples and people of African descent and is the author of Race and the Cherokee Nation: Sovereignty in the Nineteenth Century (2007). More...

 

 

 

Please note: Andrew Cayton, former Professor and Warner Woodring Chair at the Ohio State University, was included in the original schedule for this institute, but unexpectedly passed away in December 2015. Our condolences go to the Cayton family.



Fay Yarbrough is Associate Professor of History at Rice University, where she teaches courses on nineteenth-century American history, including the “Nineteenth-Century Black Experience.” She is particularly interested in the interactions between indigenous peoples and people of African descent and is the author of Race and the Cherokee Nation: Sovereignty in the Nineteenth Century (2007). More...