FUTURE, CURRENT, AND RECENT OFFERINGS


Future courses: Spring 2018

To find out when and and where courses are being taught, click here

Art History 3303 – RENAISSANCE ART IN ITALY. Kirk Duclaux. Focuses on Renaissance art and architecture in Italy from a social and cultural framework, beginning in the 1200's and ending around 1580. Taught on OU's campus in Arezzo, Italy.

Art History 4273/5273 – BYZANTINE ICONS. Rozmeri Basic. Byzantine images occupy a principal position at the heart of the Eastern Church and they are an organic part of daily services. The icon represents a vision of the invisible, and therefore a vision founded on divine knowledge which transforms the created work into the miracle working image. This class will examine the challenging process of producing holiness and divinity through painting panels.

Art History 4463/5463 – ISSUES IN NORTHERN BAROQUE ART. Allison Palmer. Focuses on Northern Baroque art as case-study for examination of a variety of art historical methodologies and problems such as attribution, function, and meaning.

Classics 3163 – VISIONS OF HEAVEN AND HELL: VIRGIL, DANTE, AND MILTON. Honors. Ellen Greene. Focuses on Virgil's influence on Dante. Virgil celebrates, in both The Georgics and The Aeneid, the outcome of the struggle against external furor and passion and those elements within the individual. Dante, with Virgil as his spiritual guide in The Inferno, presents a series of spiritual exercises.

English 3573 – ARTHURIAN LEGEND AND LITERATURE. Slash-listed with MLLL 3573. Joyce Coleman. Sixteen hundred years old and still going strong, the legends of Britain's King Arthur have proved an inexhaustible source of entertainment, inspiration, and meaning.This course traces the medieval origins and the development of this once and future fascination, from the fifth to the twenty-first century. All readings will be in modern English.

English 4133 – HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE. Daniel Ransom. Traces the development of the English language, from its Indo-European roots to its Germanic ancestry, and then through the major phases of its transformations: Old English (Anglo-Saxon), Middle English (the language of Chaucer), Early Modern English (the language of Shakespeare), and contemporary English, in some of its various forms. We will track changes in pronunciation and spelling, changes in vocabulary, and shifts of meaning for certain words. We will also follow the adjustments in the habits of sentence formation.

English 5543 – SHAKESPEARE AND THE IDEA OF THE PERSON. David Anderson. This class will consider the development of modern personhood in the fractious, uncertain and intensely creative world of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Over the course of the semester we will read selected plays of Shakespeare’s alongside intellectual milestones such as More’s Utopia and Descartes’ Meditations, as well as contemporary critical and historical scholarship.

History 3073 – THE RENAISSANCE. Jane Wickersham. Examines the European Renaissance, a time period that was crucial to the development of western European culture, intellectual thought, and state formation. By reviving classical antiquity, the Renaissance created both the classical canon of intellectual study and modern political units.

History 3113 – THE CRUSADES. Roberta Magnusson. Covers crusades to the Holy Land and Europe against Moors, pagans, heretics, and enemies of the Pope. Topics include crusade ideology, relations between Latins, Byzantines, Jews and Muslims, crusader states, techniques of warfare, and the experience of crusading.

History 3573-001 – THE VIKINGS. Robert Magnusson. A writing-intensive, open topic, seminar designed to improve students' research and writing abilities and introduce them to basic methodological issues in history. While the course is specifically meant to prepare students for their senior capstone course, the emphasis on research and writing will enhance their preparation for all upper-division history course.

History 3733 – THE HISTORY OF HEAVEN AND HELL. Shmuel Shepkaru. Traces the evolution of the concept of the afterlife, eternal reward and punishment in Judaism and Christianity from late Antiquity to the high Middle Ages.

History 3773 – JEWS AND CHRISTIANS IN THE MIDDLE AGESShmuel Shepkaru. Traces the development of the relationship between the Jewish minority and the Christian majority in medieval Europe, from the fifth century to the early modern period. Discusses how Jews and Christians dealt with and imagined each other.

History 3933 – HISTORY OF THE GREAT WITCH-HUNT. TBD. Covers an important era in the history of human rights and misogyny while offering a view of early modern Europe through social, legal, political, and religious lenses.

History of Science 3013 – HISTORY OF SCIENCE TO NEWTON. 2 sections. Rienk Vermij; Kathleen Crowther. A survey of Western people's efforts to understand the natural world, from earliest historical times to the seventeenth century.

Letters 3213 – SHAKESPEARE AND CLASSICAL MYTH. Sara Coodin. Classical myth constitutes the single most important body of material that Shakespeare drew on in constructing his plays and poetry, and this course examines its significance to Shakespeare's writing. Whether used for comic, ironic, or tragic effect, Shakespeare's many allusions to Classical myth introduce us to words, images, and moral and aesthetic questions that significantly widen our perspective on his work.

Modern Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics 3303 – THE WORLD OF DANTE. Roberto Pesce. In this course students will engage in a close reading of a fundamental text in the western literary tradition: Dante Alighieri's Divine Comedy. The course will also consider one of Dante's minor works, the Vita nuova, as well as modern critical readings of Dante's writing and thought. Special attention will be paid to the historical, political, literary, and intellectual context of Dante's poetry and thought.

Modern Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics 3413 – ARABIC LITERATURE AND CULTURE. Waleed Mahdi. A survey of Arabic literature tradition and cultural history from the 4th century to the present. Covers themes and genres of the cultural heritage of Arabic-Islamic civilization, continuities and discontinuities between the classical and modern period, and background political and social changes.

Modern Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics 3573 – ARTHURIAN LEGEND AND LITERATURE. Slash-listed with ENGL 3573. Joyce Coleman. Sixteen hundred years old and still going strong, the legends of Britain's King Arthur have proved an inexhaustible source of entertainment, inspiration, and meaning.This course traces the medieval origins and the development of this once and future fascination, from the fifth to the twenty-first century. All readings will be in modern English.

Musicology 4970/5970 – ART AND MUSIC IN THE MIDDLE AGES. Eugene Enrico.

Musicology 5513 – MUSIC IN THE MIDDLE AGES. Jennifer Saltzstein. A detailed survey of music from Hildegard of Bingen through Guillaume de Machaut. Explores a wide variety of medieval musical repertories, including major sacred and vernacular musical genres. Through detailed study of primary and secondary materials, we will examine musical structures as well as the historical contexts within which they were produced.

Spanish 4713/5713 – HISTORY OF THE SPANISH LANGUAGE. Luis Cortest. As an introduction to historical Spanish Linguistics, the basic patterns of the evolution of Modern Spanish from Vulgar Latin, as shown in several major literary texts will be learned. Provides an understanding of how the Modern Spanish sound system evolved from the Vulgar Latin of the Iberian Peninsula. Emphasizes as well all four language skills (hearing, speaking, reading, and writing) and culture.

Spanish 5603 – RENAISSANCE AND BAROQUE PROSE. A. Lauer. The study of representative narrative from the Spanish Golden Age, including the Picaresque, Pastoral, Sentimental, Chivalric, Mystical and Byzantine traditions. Works by Quevedo, Fray Luis de León, Cervantes, Jorge de Montemayor, Gracián, and others.


Current courses: Fall 2017

To find out when and and where courses are being taught, click here.

Art History 3303 – RENAISSANCE ART IN ITALY. Kirk Duclaux. Focuses on Renaissance art and architecture in Italy from a social and cultural framework, beginning in the 1200's and ending around 1580. Taught on OU's campus in Arezzo, Italy.

Art History 4373/5373 – ITALIAN CITY: RENAISSANCE AND BAROQUE ARCHITECTURE. Allison Palmer. Architecture and urban planning of Italy from about 1300-1700. Emphasis on the growth of the city and how new forms of social interaction affected the development of architecture and the urban setting.

Drama 3713 – HISTORY OF THE THEATRE I. David Fennema. Acquaints the student with the development of drama, theatre and production procedures through the ages from 500 B.C. to 1780.

English 2543 – BRITISH LITERATURE TO 1700. Cortney Wilmering. From the meditations on heroism and violence of Beowulf to Chaucer’s wry, sometimes bawdy wisdom in The Canterbury Tales, onto Shakespeare’s eloquent empathy and Milton’s unrelenting search for a just politics, early literature laid a foundation that generations of later authors have built on and responded to. This course will survey some of the significant texts and movements in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance.

English 4533 – SHAKESPEARE TRAGEDIES. Sara Coodin. Close reading and analysis of Shakespeare's tragedies and lyric poetry. Selected criticism, 1600 to the present. Historical background and Shakespeare's theatre. Dramatic traditions, movie interpretations, performance theory and acting.

Expo 1213 – LOVE AND SEX IN THE MIDDLE AGES. Margaret Gaida. This course will examine love and sex in the Middle Ages from several different angles. First, we will study and write about medieval courtly love and romance through troubadour poetry and songs. Turning to female sexuality and marriage, we will consider how women’s lives were shaped by gendered expectations, particularly with respect to the Catholic Church. In the second part of the course, we will learn about different conceptions of reproduction and reproductive health in the Middle Ages, including the roles of midwives versus physicians, and learned versus practical knowledge. Lastly, we will look more broadly at women in society, understanding how gender shaped women’s lives. In this part of the course we will study women’s writing and women’s roles in family life, at court, and in the culture at large.

French 4153 – SURVEY OF FRENCH LITERATURE TO 1800. Logan Whalen. Reading and discussion of major French works and their background from the Middle Ages to the French Revolution.

French 4313 – FROM LASCAUX TO LA TERREUR. Logan Whalen. The political and social background of French literature from its beginning to the French revolution.

French 5223 – SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY THEATRE. Michael Winston. A study of dramatic works of Moliere, Corneille, Racine and other contemporaries.

German 4003/5003 – HISTORY OF THE GERMAN LANGUAGE. Joe Sullivan. Linguistic, cultural, and social evolution of the German language from Indo-European times to the present. Additional emphasis is given to the place of German within the Germanic family of languages and to significant socio-linguistic issues in German-speaking countries as they enter the new millennium.

History 1113 – HISTORY OF MEDIEVAL EUROPE. Roberta Magnusson. History of Europe from the fall of Rome to the end of the 15th century. Emphasis on the development of social structures and culture forms, and the sociocultural background of political and religious developments. 

History 3053 – MEDIEVAL ITALY. Roberta Magnusson. A survey of Italy from circa 400-1350 CE, emphasizing the mix of Roman, Christian, and barbarian traditions, relations between the church and empire, and the role of cities and commerce.

History 3143 – THE ERA OF THE REFORMATION. Jane Wickersham. An analysis of the forces leading to the religious upheaval in the sixteenth century and the spread of Protestantism in Northern European countries; the Catholic Reformation or Reaction; Thirty Years War; and the relation of the Reformation Era to medieval and modern civilization.

History 3363 – LEGAL AND CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY OF ENGLAND I. James Hart. The first part of a course of lectures on the development of the English constitution, and of legal concepts, institutions and procedures from the Anglo-Saxons to the present.

History of Science 3013 – HISTORY OF SCIENCE TO NEWTON. 2 sections: Steven Livesey; Rienk Vermij. A survey of Western people's efforts to understand the natural world, from earliest historical times to the seventeenth century.

History of Science 3823 – SCIENCE IN MEDIEVAL CULTURE. Steven Livesey. A survey of the historical development of medieval scientific, mathematical, medical, and philosophical thought.

History of Science 5523 – HISTORY OF RENAISSANCE AND EARLY MODERN SCIENCE. Rienk Vermij. Thematic historical analyses of scientific ideas and practices in the scientific revolution and the Enlightenment, 16th-18th centuries. Includes examination of sources and critical assessment of scholarly interpretations.

History of Science 5550 – HISTORY OF THE BOOK. Kerry Magruder.

History of Science 5990 – HISTORY OF SCIENCE TO THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. Participating faculty: Peter Barker; Kathleen Crowther; Steven J. Livesey; Kerry Magruder; Rienk Vermij. Introduces graduate students to the history and historiography of “science” between antiquity and the 17th century. Major themes include the interactions between natural knowledge and religious beliefs and practices; the institutional context of natural knowledge (including monasteries, universities, scientific societies, courts and museums); and the historiographical problem of the “Scientific Revolution.”

Honors 3993 – THE BIBLE AND MILTON. David Anderson. In this course we will read the Bible alongside some of Milton’s most important poetry. Our focus will be on three works that scholars have dubbed “the great poems”: Paradise Lost, which tells the story of the fall of the rebel angels and of humankind; the brief epic Paradise Regained, which dramatizes Christ’s temptation by Satan in the desert; and Samson Agonistes, a dramatic tragedy about one of the major figures of the Old Testament.

International Area Studies 3003-008 – CHRISTIANS AND JEWS UNDER ISLAM. Gershon Lewental. 

International Area Studies 3413 – IRAN AND ISLAM TO 1800. Gershon Lewental. Surveys the role of Iran within Middle Eastern history, culture, and society from antiquity to the eve of the modern period. Topics include: Iranian empires in the ancient period, the history and religious thought of Zoroastrianism, the advent of Islam and the Arab conquest of Iran; the contribution of Iranian culture to the formation of Islamic thought; the emergence of a Persian literary tradition within Islamic culture; the emergence of the Turko-Persian Safavid state in the sixteenth century and the formation of a Shi'ite-Iranian culture; and the beginning of European influence at the end of the 18th century.

Italian 3553 – SURVEY OF ITALIAN LITERATURE AND CULTURE I. Roberto Pesce. Survey of the history of Italian literature and culture from early development of the Italian language in the 13th century up to the Italian Risorgimento (second half of the 18th century). Students will read selected texts of the Italian literary tradition in order to develop a foundational understanding of literary traditions that have constructed "Italian" identity(ies). Students will also read secondary readings to facilitate an understanding of historical, political, and cultural contexts. 

Medieval and Renaissance Studies 3023 – DREAM COURSE: EXPLORING MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE STUDIES. Joyce Coleman. Provides an overview of the history, literature, art, and music of the Middle Ages and Renaissance, including hands-on work with medieval manuscripts and early printed books. This course will be taught by a series of faculty lecturing in their area of expertise, coordinated by a faculty member who will be present at every class and will serve as instructor of record. For Fall 2017 the course will be a Presidential Dream Course, meaning that we will be bringing in guest speakers and holding associated events, to all of which the students will be invited.

Music 2313 – ANCIENT TIMES TO 1700. 2 sections. Jennifer Saltzstein. A study of the development of music from its inception to the late Baroque era conducted through lectures, readings, listening and analysis.

Music 5543 – THE BAROQUE ERA. Eugene Enrico. A detailed study of music from Monteverdi through J.S. Bach.


Recent courses: Spring 2017

To find out when and and where courses are being taught, click here. 

Art History 3303 – RENAISSANCE ART IN LITERATURE 1200-1600. Kirk Duclaux. Focuses on Renaissance art and architecture in Italy from a social and cultural framework, beginning in the 1200's and ending around 1580. Taught on OU's campus in Arezzo, Italy.

Art History 4273 – BYZANTINE ICONSRozmeri Basic. Byzantine images occupy a principal position at the heart of the Eastern Church and they are an organic part of daily services. The icon represents a vision of the invisible, and therefore a vision founded on divine knowledge which transforms the created work into the miracle working image. This Class will examine the challenging process of producing holiness and divinity through painting panels. 

Art History 4463 – ISSUES IN NORTHERN BAROQUE ART. Allison Palmer. Focuses on Northern Baroque art as case-study for examination of a variety of art historical methodologies and problems such as attribution, function, and meaning.

Classics 3163 – VISIONS OF HEAVEN AND HELL: VIRGIL, DANTE, AND MILTON.  Honors. Ellen Greene. Focuses on Virgil's influence on Dante. Virgil celebrates, in both The Georgics and The Aeneid, the outcome of the struggle against external furor and passion and those elements within the individual. Dante, with Virgil as his spiritual guide in The Inferno, presents a series of spiritual exercises. 

English 4013 – MAJOR FIGURES: J.R.R. TOLKEIN, THE ROAD TO MIDDLE EARTH. Joyce Coleman. Traces Tolkien's "road to Middle Earth," reading his famous works against the medieval texts that inspired them, along with biographical material and his own critical writing about literature and fantasy. SPOILER ALERT: Since so many people have already read The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings or seen the movies, class discussion will include references to the later chapters and conclusions of both works.

English 4133 – HISTORY OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE. Daniel Ransom. Traces the development of the English language, from its Indo-European roots to its Germanic ancestry, and then through the major phases of its transformations: Old English (Anglo-Saxon), Middle English (the language of Chaucer), Early Modern English (the language of Shakespeare), and contemporary English, in some of its various forms. We will track changes in pronunciation and spelling, changes in vocabulary, and shifts of meaning for certain words. We will also follow the adjustments in the habits of sentence formation.

English 4523 – SHAKESPEARE COMEDIES. Kenneth Hodges. From dark political satire to sparkling romantic comedy, high political drama to slapstick, Shakespeare’s comedies and histories are at once deeply literary works and effective commercial theater, still dominating popular markets. This class will explore Shakespeare’s artistry and his social context, looking at plays such as Twelfth Night, Taming of the Shrew, and Henry IV part 1 (with the immortal Falstaff). 

English 4603 – SEARCHING FOR HAMLET. Su Fang Ng and Sara Coodin. Explores how Shakespeare’s play remains relevant to audiences over its 400-year ­long history. We examine the diverse, often contradictory ways that Hamlet has been read, performed, and interpreted over its long historical afterlife, both within and outside the Western tradition. The course spans the centuries from Hamlet’s early modern origins through its adaptation on the Restoration and 18th century stage, to later modern and postmodern engagements both in the West and globally.

English 5543 – GLOBAL SHAKESPEARE. Su Fang Ng. This course has 3 parts. Part I looks at globalization in the early modern period and how English drama and Shakespeare participated in discourses of early modern empire. Through the drama, we will also consider early modern discourses of race and foreign relations. Part II looks at key adaptations and reception of Shakespeare in the eighteenth through nineteenth centuries, focusing on the Restoration operatic Tempest and Romantic ideas of Shakespeare. Part III examines postcolonial adaptations that came out of African and Caribbean decolonization, including Aimé Césaire, as well as contemporary non-western dramatic adaptations, Sulayman al-Bassam Arabic Al-Hamlet Summit and film versions of Shakespeare from India and Japan. 

French 5313 – INTRODUCTION TO OLD FRENCH. Logan Whalen. History of the French vernacular from Latin to Modern French: external history, phonology, morphology, lexicon, syntax, with emphasis on phonological evolution; and introduction to the reading of Old French via short excerpts from monuments of literature, from the Strasbourg Oaths to Cent Nouvelles Nouvelles.

German 4313 – LITERATURE AND CULTURE PRE-1700. Joseph Sullivan. From the beginnings until the end of the seventeenth century. A survey of literature, art, religion, social relations, music and history.

History 3113 – THE CRUSADES. Roberta Magnusson. Covers crusades to the Holy Land and Europe against Moors, pagans, heretics, and enemies of the Pope. Topics include crusade ideology, relations between Latins, Byzantines, Jews and Muslims, crusader states, techniques of warfare, and the experience of crusading.

History 3733 – THE HISTORY OF HEAVEN AND HELL. Shmuel Shepkaru. Traces the evolution of the concept of the afterlife, eternal reward and punishment in Judaism and Christianity from late Antiquity to the high Middle Ages. 

History 3983 – MEDIEVAL JEWISH HISTORY. Shmuel Shepkaru. Survey of Jewish history from the fall of the Second Temple in 70 C.E. to the expulsion from Spain in 1492. Primary emphasis on the social and intellectual history of the Jewish communities of the Islamic world and of Latin Christendom and their relations with the two great medieval civilizations. 

History of Science 3013 – HISTORY OF SCIENCE TO THE AGE OF NEWTON. Rienk Vermij. A survey of Western people's efforts to understand the natural world, from earliest historical times to the seventeenth century.

History of Science 3453 – SCIENCE AND CIVILIZATION IN ISLAM. Suzanne Moon and Aparna Nair. History of scientific traditions and ideas in Islamic civilization, from the origins of Islam to the early modern period. Emphasis is on the derivation, development and transmission of Islamic science, as well as on the assimilation and influence of science within Islamic culture. 

History of Science 3833 – THE SCIENTIFIC REVOLUTION. Steven Livesey. Explores the history of the "scientific revolution" of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Study includes understanding debates not just about what happened in the past but about how we today define science and how we understand the place of science in the modern world. 

History of Science 5513 – ADVANCED STUDIES IN THE HISTORY OF ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL SCIENCE. Steven Livesey. Thematic historical analyses of ancient and/or medieval foundations of science, focusing on the development of particular disciplines or scientific institutions, the relationship between science and religion, or transmission of science. Includes examination of sources and critical assessment of scholarly interpretations.

Letters 3123 – THE EXAMINED LIFE II:  MIDDLE AGES AND RENAISSANCE. Rebecca Huskey. Survey of the great books of the Middle Ages and Renaissance, with emphasis on the impact of these texts on modern thought. Can be applied toward the Letters major's requirement in history, literature, or philosophy.

Letters 3213 – SHAKESPEARE AND CLASSICAL MYTH. Sara Coodin. Classical myth constitutes the single most important body of material that Shakespeare drew on in constructing his plays and poetry, and this course examines its significance to Shakespeare's writing. Whether used for comic, ironic, or tragic effect, Shakespeare's many allusions to Classical myth introduce us to words, images, and moral and aesthetic questions that significantly widen our perspective on his work. 

Modern Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics 3573 – ARTHURIAN LEGEND AND LITERATURE.  2 sections. Kenneth Hodges and TBD. Examination of the legend of King Arthur in European literature. Concentrate first on the historical Arthur, followed by major portion of semester on the medieval and modern literary texts concerning Arthur and the Round Table. All texts will be read in English translation. 

Musicology 5513 – MUSIC IN THE MIDDLE AGES. Jennifer Saltzstein. A detailed survey of music from Hildegard of Bingen through Guillaume de Machaut. Explores a wide variety of medieval musical repertories, including major sacred and vernacular musical genres. Through detailed study of primary and secondary materials, we will examine musical structures as well as the historical contexts within which they were produced.

Spanish 5333 – STUDIES IN MEDIEVAL LITERATURE. Luis Cortest. A study of the representative works and genres of the Middle Ages. 


Recent courses: Fall 2016

To find out when and and where courses are being taught, click here.

Art History 3303 – RENAISSANCE ART IN ITALY, 1200-1600.
Kirk Duclaux. Focuses on Renaissance art and architecture in Italy from a social and cultural framework, beginning in the 1200s and ending around 1580. Taught on OU's campus in Arezzo, Italy.

Art History 3403 – BAROQUE ART & ARCHITECTURE IN EUROPE. 
Prof. Allison Palmer. Covers art and architecture in Europe in the seventeenth century, during the time period called the Baroque.

English 2433 – WORLD LITERATURE TO 1700. Prof. Su Fang Ng. A reading of literary works, by types, from classical antiquity to 1700.

English 2543 – ENGLISH LITERATURE FROM 1375-1700. 2 sections. Prof. Kenneth Hodges. A survey of major writers and literary movements from Chaucer through Dryden.

English 4533 – SHAKESPEARE TRAGEDIES. Prof. Su Fang Ng. Close reading and analysis of Shakespeare's tragedies and lyric poetry. Selected criticism, 1600 to the present. Historical background and Shakespeare's theatre. Dramatic traditions, movie interpretations, performance theory and acting.

English 5513 – CHAUCER’S TROILUS AND CRISEYDE. Prof. Dan Ransom. Close reading and textual analysis of Chaucer’s Troilus and Criseyde.

French 4153 – SURVEY OF FRENCH LITERATURE TO 1800. Prof. Logan Whalen. Reading and discussion of major French works and their background from the Middle Ages to the French Revolution.

French 4313 – FROM LASCAUX TO LA TERREUR. Prof. Logan Whalen. The political and social background of French literature from its beginning to the French revolution.

German 5970 – ARTHURIAN ROMANCE. Prof. Joseph Sullivan. Special topics or seminar course for content not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. May include library and/or laboratory research and field projects.

History 1113 – HISTORY OF MEDIEVAL EUROPE. Prof. Roberta Magnusson. History of Europe from the fall of Rome to the end of the 15th century. Emphasis on the development of social structures and culture forms, and the sociocultural background of political and religious developments.

History 1223 – EUROPE, 1500-1815. Prof. Judith Lewis. An introductory survey of Europe in the early modern period. Topics include the Reformation, development of the nation-state, the Enlightenment, and the French Revolution and Napoleon.

History 1723 – EAST ASIA TO 1600. Prof. Jesse Chapman. A general survey of the histories of China and Japan with the history of Korea included as it bears upon the history of Japan. The focus is on the political, social, economic, and intellectual aspects of China and Japan, and their points of contact.

History 2613 – HISPANIC AMERICAN HISTORY, 1492-1810. Prof. Raphael Folsom. The founding and development of the Spanish and Portuguese empires in America with special attention to the conquest of native civilizations and to the political, economic, social and intellectual institutions of the colonial period.

History 4033 – THE RENAISSANCE. Prof. Jane Wickersham. Examines the European Renaissance, a time period that was crucial to the development of Western European culture, intellectual thought, and state formation. This pivotal time period built the foundations of modern Western culture.

History of Science 3013 – HISTORY OF SCIENCE TO NEWTON. 2 sections: Prof. Steven Livesey; Prof. Rienk Vermij. A survey of Western people's efforts to understand the natural world, from earliest historical times to the seventeenth century.

Letters 3203 – REVENGE TRAGEDY. Prof. Sara Coodin. Focuses on the revenge tragedy, a genre of entertainment that has enjoyed widespread popularity from its inception in classical antiquity up to the present day in commercial film. Investigates the origins of the revenge tragedy in Seneca's Medea, Thomas Kyd's Spanish Tragedy, and Shakespeare's Hamlet, and explores the ways that modern horror, action, and mobster films adopt and adapt conventions from these seminal works.

Musicology 2313 – ANCIENT TIMES TO 1700. Prof. Roger Rideout. 2 sections. A study of the development of music from its inception to the late Baroque era conducted through lectures, readings, listening and analysis.

Spanish 4083 – LITERATURE AND CULTURE OF SPAIN. Prof. Luis Cortest. Introduces the literature and culture of Spain. It covers canonical texts from the Early to the Early Modern Period. It also emphasizes culture throughout its rich history. Like all other courses in Spanish, it emphasizes as well all four language skills (hearing, speaking, reading, and writing) and culture.

Spanish 5513 – COLONIAL LITERATURE: THE ENCOUNTER. Prof. Grady Wray. The objective of this course is to familiarize students with early colonial Latin American discourse and its cultural/literary/historic context. Beginning with the letters of Christopher Columbus, the course includes early chronicles and histories.

Women's and Gender Studies 3933 – PRE-MODERN WITCHCRAFT. Dr. Andreea Marculescu. This class will explore how the figure of the pre-modern female witch emerges as an object of knowledge, investigation, and control in the literature and theological thought of pre-modern Europe. In addition to archival materials pertaining to witchcraft trials and major theological texts discussing the status of witches, we will also read literary texts centered on pre-modern and postcolonial representation of witches such as Fernando de Rojas, Celestina; Thomas Dekker's The Witch of Edmonton; and Maryse Condé's I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem.


Recent courses: Spring 2016

Art History 3303 – RENAISSANCE ART IN ITALY. 1200-1600. Kirk Duclaux. Focuses on Renaissance art and architecture in Italy from a social and cultural framework, beginning in the 1200s and ending around 1580. Taught on OU's campus in Arezzo, Italy.

Art History 4273/5273 – BYZANTINE ICONS. Prof. Rozmeri Basic. Byzantine images occupy a principal position at the heart of the Eastern Church and they are an organic part of daily services. The icon represents a vision of the invisible, and therefore a vision founded on divine knowledge which transforms the created work into the miracle working image. This class will examine the challenging process of producing holiness and divinity through painting panels.

Art History 4463/5463 – ISSUES IN NORTHERN BAROQUE ART. Prof. Allison Palmer. Focuses on Northern Baroque art as case-study for examination of a variety of art historical methodologies and problems such as attribution, function, and meaning.

Classics 3163 – VISIONS OF HEAVEN AND HELL. Prof. Ellen Greene. Focuses on Virgil's influence on Dante. Virgil celebrates, in both The Georgics and The Aeneid, the outcome of the struggle against external furor and passion and those elements within the individual. Dante, with Virgil as his spiritual guide in The Inferno, presents a series of spiritual exercises.

English 4133 – HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE. Prof. Daniel Ransom. Traces the development of the English language from its Indo-European origins through its present state. Special attention will be paid to changes in grammar and vocabulary.

English 4523 – SHAKESPEARE COMEDIES. Prof. Kenneth Hodges. Close reading and analysis of Shakespeare's comedies and histories. Selected criticism, 1600 to the present. Historical background and Shakespeare's theatre. Dramatic traditions, movie interpretations, performance theory and acting. Emphases and reading lists vary from year to year.

French 5623 – 17th-CENTURY PROSE AND POETRY. Prof. Julia Abramson. A survey of baroque, précieux and classical style, form and content as exemplified in the prose and poetry of the period.

History 3113 – THE CRUSADES. Prof. Roberta Magnusson. Covers crusades to the Holy Land and Europe against Moors, pagans, heretics, and enemies of the Pope. Topics include crusade ideology, relations between Latins, Byzantines, Jews and Muslims, crusader states, techniques of warfare, and the experience of crusading.

History 3950—JEWS AND CHRISTIANS UNDER ISLAM. Prof. D Gershon Lewental. Since its founding in the early seventh century, Islam has maintained a complex relationship to the Jewish and Christian traditions that preceded it. On the one hand, religious figures and texts consciously built upon their monotheistic foundations, linking Muslims to Jews and Christians in worship of the same God, tracing Muḥammad’s genealogical ancestry to Abraham, and alluding in the Qurʾān to stories and messages from the Hebrew Bible and the Christian Gospels. On the other hand, as a successor religion, Islam differentiates itself from the prior traditions in order to provide its adherents with a unique and superseding message. This tension finds expression in the different and differing attitudes towards Jews and Christians—known as ‘Peoples of the Book’ and ‘protected minorities’—in Muslim society. Their experience has ranged widely, including periods of productive harmony, considerable toleration, and harsh persecution. Likewise, Jews and Christians adapted variously to their Islamic surroundings, contributing to their societies in the fields of philosophy, science, trade, culture, and more. In this course, we will survey the major themes of Jewish and Christian lives in the Islamic world from its origins to the present day, with the hope of understanding better the challenges and realities of the contemporary Middle East.

History of Science 3013 – HISTORY OF SCIENCE TO NEWTON.2 sections: Prof. Steven Livesey; Prof. Rienk Vermij. A survey of Western people's efforts to understand the natural world, from earliest historical times to the seventeenth century.

History of Science 3453 – SCIENCE AND CIVILIZATION IN ISLAM. Prof. Peter Barker. History of scientific traditions and ideas in Islamic civilization, from the origins of Islam to the early modern period. Emphasis is on the derivation, development and transmission of Islamic science, as well as on the assimilation and influence of science within Islamic culture.

History of Science 3823 – SCIENCE IN MEDIEVAL CULTURE. Prof. Steven Livesey. A survey of the historical development of medieval scientific, mathematical, medical, and philosophical thought.

History of Science 5523 – RENAISSANCE / EARLY MODERN SCIENCE. Prof. Rienk Vermij. Thematic historical analyses of scientific ideas and practices in the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment, 16th-18th centuries. Includes examination of sources and critical assessment of scholarly interpretations.

History of Science 5970 -- HISTORY OF THE BOOK: CODEX TO HYPERTEXT. Prof. Kathleen Crowther. This course will examine the changing technologies for producing and illustrating texts between the late Middle Ages and the twenty-first century, evolving notions of authority and authoship, and different forms of literacy and reading practices. He course is open to interested grad students in history of science, art history, history, English, modern languages, library science, and related fields.

International Area Studies 3003 – RELIGION AND SOCIETY IN THE MIDDLE EAST. Prof. D Gershon Lewental. Critical to understanding the modern Middle East is an appreciation of the rôle that religion has played in the societies of the region since Antiquity. In this course, we will examine the way that religion has functioned in Middle Eastern societies, beginning with ancient Near Eastern cultures, including ancient Israel, the Christian Roman Empire, and the Zoroastrian Sāsānian Empire of Iran. We will study the rise of Islam and its own patchwork of religious traditions, as well as the various Islamic societies that emerged—from the earliest Islamic empires to the Ottoman and Iranian empires. The class will conclude with a thorough look at religion in the Middle Eastern landscape today, covering topics such as religion in Turkey, Iran, and Israel, minority identities, the challenge of nationalism, the Bahāʾī faith, radical Islam, and collective memory. Throughout the course, we will touch upon several recurring themes, including states’ use and abuse of religion, the nature of religion as a primary marker of identity, and varying patterns of religious expression in the region.

Italian 4993 – ITALIAN GEOGRAPHIES. Prof. Jason Houston. The term "geographies" broadly encompasses spatial, symbolic, and rhetorical constructions of Italy across centuries. Course is structured around tropes, utopia, regionalism and mobility. Approach will include readings of literary and cultural materials, and will map an abstract geography of connected "Italies" that both informs and gives shape to the discourse of Italian identity.

Letters 3213 – SHAKESPEARE AND CLASSICAL MYTH. Prof. Sara Coodin. Classical myth constitutes the single most important body of material that Shakespeare drew on in constructing his plays and poetry, and this course examines its significance to Shakespeare's writing. Whether used for comic, ironic, or tragic effect, Shakespeare's many allusions to Classical myth introduce us to words, images, and moral and aesthetic questions that significantly widen our perspective on his work.

Musicology 5513 – MUSIC IN THE MIDDLE AGES. Prof. Jennifer Saltzstein. A detailed survey of music from Hildegard of Bingen through Guillaume de Machaut. Explores a wide variety of medieval musical repertories, including major sacred and vernacular musical genres. Through detailed study of primary and secondary materials, we will examine musical structures as well as the historical contexts within which they were produced.

Spanish 5623 – RENAISSANCE AND BAROQUE POETRY. Prof. A. R. Lauer. Poetry of Garcilaso, Boscan, Fray Luis de Leon, Fernando de Herrera, Luis de Gongora, Francisco Quevedo, Lope de Vega, and others. Concepts of imitatio, cultismo, conceptismo, and the petrarchan and satirical traditions.