Current Course Schedules


 Spring 2017 │
Click here for pdf flyer.

5513 – Advanced Studies in the History of Ancient and Medieval Science │
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor
Section 001 Professor Steven J. Livesey                      M 1:30-4:20                         BL 418

Thematic historical analyses of ancient and/or medieval foundations of science, focusing on the development of particular disciplines or scientific institutions, the relationship between science and religion, or transmission of science.  Includes examination of sources and critical assessment of scholarly interpretations.

5550 – Topics in the History of Science - Islamic Science │
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor
Section 001 Professor Peter Barker                             W 1:30-4:20                        Kaufman 319

A survey of current scholarship, including material intended to advance current research by students here, but also with the aim of providing a firm historical foundation for others wishing to understand the history of science in Islamicate societies. Topics covered will include: the historiography of the 'decline thesis', denials of Copernicus' debt to Islamic astronomy, and scientific activity in the Ottoman, Safavid and Mughal empires after 1500.

5550 – Topics in the History of Science - Gender Issues in Science, Technology and Medicine │
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor
Section 002 Associate Professor Katherine Pandora     MW 9:00-11:50     PhSc 626

Historical analysis of gender issues in science, technology and medicine, and in comparison with current practices. Topics will include questions in scientific method, particularly the concept of “objectivity,” bio-social theories of gender; gender issues in scientific inquiry, in the development of and engagement with technologies, and in medical thought and practice; media images; and feminist science fiction.

5613 – Issues and Methods in the Digital Humanities│
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor
(Slashlisted with 4613; no student may earn credit for both 4613 and 5613.)
Section 001 Associate Professor Katherine Pandora             T 1:30-4:20                  Burton 208
 
Introduction to the central issues, methods, and tools in the emerging field of the digital humanities.  Digital humanities is an interdisciplinary set of methods, concepts, values, and practices that enable scholars to create and apply new technologies to answer social, cultural, and historical questions.

5990 – Graduate Survey: History of Science since the 17th Century│ 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor
Section 002 Associate Professor Stephen Weldon                R 1:30-4:20                  TBA

Participating faculty: Associate Professor Piers Hale, Professor Hunter Heyck, Associate Professor Suzanne Moon, Associate Professor Katherine Pandora, Assistant Professor Peter Soppelsa

Graduate introduction to selected topics in the history of modern science.  Possible topics include history of biology and the environment, history of technology, history of science and popular culture, history of the social sciences, and history of the relationship between science and religion.

Rev. 10-21-16



Fall 2016

5533 – Advanced Studies in the History of Modern Science │

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor
Associate Professor Katherine Pandora
Section 001     R 1:30-4:20     BL 324

Thematic historical analyses of modern science and culture focusing on the European and American development and professionalization of scientific disciplines, interdisciplinary relations among the sciences, and intersections between scientific and public culture. Includes examination of sources and critical assessment of scholarly interpretations.

5550 – Topics in the History of Science│

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor
Professor Steven Livesey
Section 001     M 1:30-4:20      PhSc 120

While the university was certainly not the only venue for the study of science, it was an especially important one, both for the inception and evolution of medieval scientific ideas and for their transmission during the middle ages and subsequently.  In this course, we will survey the institutions of learning available to scholars prior to the twelfth century as well as the preparatory schools in place after the formation of universities; the cultural and intellectual foundations of universities; the evolution of the institution from a handful of universal entities, drawing on a wide catchment for students, to national or regional foundations by the end of the middle ages; the curriculum, especially as it concerns scientific issues; techniques of teaching, learning and transmission of knowledge; the place of the university within the larger society; and educational shifts at the end of the middle ages.

 5623 – Practicum/Internship in the Digital Humanities

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor
Associate Professor Katherine Pandora
Section 001          TR  10:30-11:45          PhSc 626

A practical, project-based internship, focused on the design and development of a project in the digital humanities under the close supervision of a faculty member.  (Slashlisted with 5623; no student may earn credit for both 4623 and 5623.)

 5970 – Seminar: Research, Criticism, and Analysis │

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor
Associate Professor Hunter Heyck
Section 001                                       T 1:30-4:20                                        BL 324


Methods and practice of research in the history of science, including use of sources, bibliographical tools, and the writing of research results. Critical examination of different approaches to and interpretations of science’s past development and cultural relations.

5990 – Graduate Survey: History of Science to the 17th Century │ New Time

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor
TBA (coordinator); participating faculty: Professor Peter Barker; Associate Professor Kathleen Crowther; Professor Steven J. Livesey; Associate Professor Kerry Magruder; Professor Rienk Vermij
Section 002                                       W 1:30-4:20                                           BL 324


This course introduces graduate students to the history and historiography of “science” between antiquity and the 17th century. Major themes include the interactions between natural knowledge and religious beliefs and practices; the institutional context of natural knowledge (including monasteries, universities, scientific societies, courts and museums); and the historiographical problem of the “Scientific Revolution.”

Rev. 07-26-16