Kimberly G. Wieser

Associate Professor

Education:
Ph.D., Baylor University, 2002

 




Dr.. Kimberly Wieser is an Associate Professor of English and an affiliated faculty member with Native American Studies and Environmental Studies at the University of Oklahoma. She also serves as President of the Board of Returning the Gift, Inc. Under her previous name, Kimberly Roppolo, she was one of the co-authors of Reasoning Together: The Native Critics Collective (Oklahoma, 2008), named one of the most important books in her field in the first decade of the twenty-first century by NAISA. Her book Back to the Blanket: Recovered Rhetorics and American Indian Studies, based on her manuscript that won the Native Writers Circle of the Americas First Books Award for Prose 2004, was published in November 2017 and is available from the University of Oklahoma Press.

Her volume of poetry, Texas . . . to Get Horses, will be available from That Painted Horse Press in Spring 2018.

She has written and published poems, stories, plays, articles, book reviews, and reference entries for anthologies and for publications such as Studies in American Indian Literatures; American Indian Quarterly; Women Write Resistance: Poets Resist Gender Violence; Kuikatl—A XicanIndio Literary & Arts Journal; Black Magnolias: A Literary Journal; Sentence; Yellow Medicine Review; Rabbit and Rose; River, Blood, Corn; Indian Country Noir; The People Who Stayed Behind: Southeastern Indian Writing After the Removal; Frontiers: A Journal of Women’s Studies; and This Bridge We Call Home: Radical Visions for Transformation, among others.

Contact:
Office: Cate 2, Room 328
Email: kroppolo@ou.edu

Research and Teaching Interests: 

American Indian and Indigenous literature, rhetoric, theory, and gender studies; American Indian creative writing


Bookshelf:

Back to the Blanket: Recovered Rhetorics and American Indian Studies (University of Oklahoma Press, 2017)

Texas . . . to Get Horses (That Painted Horse Press, 2017)

Reasoning Together: The Native Critics Collective (University of Oklahoma Press, 2008)

Selected Scholarly Articles:

“Healing the ‘Man of Monstrous Dreams’: Indian Masculinities in Ceremony.” Leslie Marmon Silko: Ceremony, Almanac of the Dead, Gardens of the Dunes. Studies in Contemporary North American Fiction Series. Ed. David Moore. (Bloomsbury Academic Pres, 2016))

“‘Who is Cherokee?’: Federal Recognition, Culture, and Rhetorical Sovereignty.” Forthcoming in Southeastern Indian Literature. Ed. Marcia Haag. (University of Nebraska Press, 2016)

“Symbolic Racism, History, and Reality: The Real Problem with Indian Mascots.” In Readings for Diversity and Social Justice (Routledge, 2010); an earlier version is published in Genocide of the Mind: An Anthology of Urban Indians (Thunder's Mouth/Nation Books, 2003)

“Getting Ourselves Back to the Garden: Death, Life, and Rebirth in Silko’s Gardens in the Dunes.” In Reading Leslie Marmon Silko: Critical Perspectives through Gardens in the Dunes (Pisa University Press, 2007; University of Nebraska Press, 2008)

“Washita, a Slaughter, not a Battle: A Cheyenne Survivor’s Perspective.” Translated with Eugene Blackbear, Sr. In  Eating Fire, Tasting Blood: Breaking the Great Silence of the American Indian Holocaust (Thunder's Mouth/Nation Books, 2006)

Selected Creative Writing: 

“Putting Down Her Bundle.” Poem. Tending the Fire: Native Voices. Ed. and photographer, Chris Felver. U of New Mexico P. 2017.

“At Water Village.” Poem. Rabbit and Rose. 2015. Web. 16 Sept. 2017. <http://www.rabbitandrose.com/single_poem.php?id=9&id1=5>.

“kitchen table refuge.” Poem. Women Write Resistance: Poets Resist Gender Violence.  Ed. Laura Madeline Wiseman. Pittsburg: Hyacinth Girl Press, 2013: 157.

“Becoming Grandfather.” Poem. Yukhíka-látuhse (She tells us stories) 8 (2012): 15-16.

“Oklahoma Two-Step,” “Columbus Day 2009,” excerpt from Symbolic Racism, History, and Reality: The Real Problem with Indian Mascot,” entitled “We Are not Taught.” Poems and nonfiction excerpt in Cedars. Play. June Prager. Collaborative project with Mirage Theatre Company, Amerindia, and Red Eagle Soaring Theatre Group. Vassar College. Poughkeepsie, New York. September 22, 2012.

“Unega” Poem. Kuikatl—A XicanIndio Literary & Arts Journal 30 Mar. 2012. Web. 20 Apr. 2015. <http://www.kuikatl.com/kimberly-roppolo/>.

“Na he dum” and “Sweet Brown Honey.” Poems. Black Magnolias: A Literary Journal 4.4 (2011): 41-43.

“Courtship,” “Oklahoma Two-Step,” and “Long Woman.” Poems. Yellow Medicine Review (Fall 2011): 62-69.

“#49 Bear Child Blvd.” Short story. River, Blood, and Corn. 1 Oct. 2011. Web. 20 Apr. 2015. <http://riverbloodandcorn.blogspot.com/search/label/Kimberly%20Roppolo>.

“Quilt Like a Night Sky.” Short story. Indian Country Noir. Eds. Liz Martinez and Sarah Cortez. New York: Akashic Books, 2010: 273-79.

“A Song to Tell Robert Bly How We Do This in My Language,” “Una Limpia por Chelleye,” “Song for All of My Relatives South of the Red River,” “Texas Traces,” and “Unega.” Poems. The People Who Stayed Behind: Southeastern Indian Writing After the Removal. Eds. Geary Hobson and Janet McAdams. Norman: U of Oklahoma P, 2010: 309-16.

kitchen table refuge.” Poem. Sentence: A Journal of Prose Poetics 7 (2009): 143.

“Warrior Woman Who Attacks With Her Enemy Unaware,” “Fortieth September,” “Ne-he-dum,” and “Inheritance.” Poems. Praxilla—The Online Poetry Journal from Queen and The Centre for Rhetoric and Hermeneutics. October 8, 2009. Web. No longer available.

“Morning Star Song.” Poem and photograph. Simon J. Ortiz: A Poetic Legacy of Indigenous Continuance, Belonging, and Commitment, edited by Susan Berry Brill de Ramírez and Evelina Zuni Lucero, U of New Mexico P, 2009. 170-71.

“Selections from A War You Carry in Your Pocket.” Creative non-fiction. Birthed from Scorched Hearts: Women Respond to War. Ed. MariJo Moore. Golden, CO: Fulcrum, 2008. 294-308.

“Morning Star Song.” Poem and photograph. Studies in American Indian Literatures 16.4 (2004) 89-92.

“Diaspora.” Poem. CCTE Studies 68 (2003): 60-62.

“Song for the Hunter.” Poem. Red Ink 11.1 (2002): 52.

“Carnival Pictures” and “Traveling Song for Joyce.” Poems. Frontiers: A Journal of Women’s Studies 23.2 (2002): 92-94.

“The Real Americana.” Poem. This Bridge We Call Home: Radical Visions for Transformation. Eds. Gloria E. Anzaldúa and AnaLouise Keating. New York: Routledge, 2002. 155-58.

“Selections from Breeds and Outlaws.” Mixed-genre excerpt. Children of the Dragonfly. Ed. Robert Bensen. Tucson: U of Arizona P, 2001. 191-95.

“Song for a Grandaughter of a Chata Chief Whose Likeness Hangs in the Smithsonian.” Poem. Native Realities 1.3 (2001).

“Song for My Favorite Cheyenne.” Poem. Native Realities 1.1 (Spring 2001).

“A Song to Tell Robert Bly How We Do This in My Language.” Poem. Studies in American Indian Literatures 12.3 (2000): 84.

 Plays performed, unpublished: 

The Fall. Written with Carl Big Head, Sandra Lamouche, Andrea Fox, and Gordon Fox. Family Violence Conference sponsored by Blood and Piikani Reserves. Lethbridge Lodge, Lethbridge, Alberta. October 12, 2005.

 Crazy. Featuring Byron Chief Moon. Written with Carl Big Head, Sandra Lamouche, Andrea Fox, Gordon Fox, and Chris Scout. Developed in a workshop with Tomson Highway. Returning the Gift XIII: Celebrating Our Words. University of Lethbridge. Lethbridge, Alberta. May 11-14, 2005.