OU History Professor to Edit Series on Modern Jewish History

A University of Oklahoma professor has been named editor of “Lexington Studies in Modern Jewish History, Historiography and Memory,” a record of eminent scholarly work and translated works into English. Carsten Schapkow, associate professor of history in the Schusterman Center for Judaic and Israel Studies in OU’s College of Arts and Sciences will head the multi-volume series.

The series aspires to transcend disciplinary and methodological boundaries, welcoming original scholarship that advances the understanding of the modern Jewish experience. It will cover all geographical areas and periods in modern Jewish history by welcoming scholarly contributions including cultural history, intellectual history, transnational Jewish history, global Jewish history and memory

“Getting published is demanding and difficult. I would like to help promising new scholars and those who are already established get published in a fair and transparent way,” said Schapkow. “Many scholarly publications are not yet translated into English and are first-rate publications. An English-reading audience is currently unable to know about these books, and this series will make a difference.”

Printed by Lexington Books, the series will begin with the first book being published this summer. Lexington Books is an imprint of the Rowman and Littlefield Publishing Group, Inc.

Schapkow started at OU in August 2005, and specializes in German-Jewish history and modern Jewish historiography from the 18th to the 20th centuries. His classes focus on the modern Jewish experience in its European dimensions.

Before coming to OU, Schapkow was a research fellow at the Simon Dubnow Institute for Jewish History and Culture at Leipzig University from 2000 to 2005. In fall 2003, he was a visiting assistant professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Schapkow earned his doctorate from the Free University Berlin in 2000.

 The Schusterman Center for Judaic and Israel Studies at OU offers an exceptionally wide variety of courses, including Jewish history in all periods and places, Hebrew language and literature at all levels, the Bible and its Interpretation, Israel Studies, the Holocaust/Genocide and Jewish literature in translation, as well as anthropological, sociological and political perspectives on the Jewish experience.

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