HSCI and Digital Humanities at OU

Included in the 2014-2015 objectives for digital humanities at OU is recognition of the innovative ways in which our graduate students are using digital means to experiment with emerging genres of written and visual communication to engage in scholarship and public humanities through the use of new media, in addition to explorations with new research tools and other innovative forms of digital scholarly inquiry.

We are pleased to highlight one such project below, launched on October 14th, Ada Lovelace Day.

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[ Lady Science || edited by Leila McNeill and Anna Reser ]

In honor of Ada Lovelace Day, we're pleased to announce a monthly email newsletter about women in science and popular culture.

Lady Science is a monthly dose of cultural criticism, usually in the form of two easy-to-swallow essays. We focus on stories about women in science, technology and medicine, both in modern, popular media and in history.

For our first issue, we explore and challenge the representations of women in period medical dramas like Breathless, The Knick, and Call the Midwife. We came to this topic upon realizing that these shows, with Call the Midwife being the one exception, emphasize the lives of men and de-emphasize the experiences of women, even when obstetrics and gynecology is the medical focus of the entire show or episode. While it is true that there were more male than female doctors and surgeons during the time periods these shows are set, it is, however, incorrect to labor under the misconception that women were not involved in medical decisions regarding their own bodies. Yet, this is the representation we are given in these medical dramas. To use obstetrics and gynecology to tell a story about scientific progress, the writers implicitly frame women’s knowledge and skills as backward, reinforcing the notion that women are irrational and, thus, need to be saved from their own bodies by the knowledge of men.

Subscribe here: tinyletter.com/ladyscience
Info and issue descriptions at: ladyscience.com
____

Edited by:

Leila McNeill

Recently received a MA in History of Science focusing on midwifery, public health, and popular medical texts for women in the nineteenth century.
Contact: @leilasedai, leilawritesstuff.com

Anna Reser
Currently completing an MA thesis in History of Technology about the myth, memory and men of the American space program.
Contact: @annanreser, annareser.com

The first issue will hit inboxes on Friday October 17!
____

More information about Ada Lovelace Day here: findingada.com
____

Interested in writing for Lady Science? Send a brief email with your proposal and a bit of information about yourself to ladyscienceinfo@gmail.com.

What's New?

HSCI and Digital Humanities at OU

Included in the 2014-2015 objectives for digital humanities at OU is recognition of the innovative ways in which our graduate students are using digital means to experiment with emerging genres of written and visual communication to engage in scholarship and public humanities through the use of new media, in addition to explorations with new research tools and other innovative forms of digital scholarly inquiry.

We are pleased to highlight one such project below, launched on October 14th, Ada Lovelace Day.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

[ Lady Science || edited by Leila McNeill and Anna Reser ]

In honor of Ada Lovelace Day, we're pleased to announce a monthly email newsletter about women in science and popular culture.

Lady Science is a monthly dose of cultural criticism, usually in the form of two easy-to-swallow essays. We focus on stories about women in science, technology and medicine, both in modern, popular media and in history.

For our first issue, we explore and challenge the representations of women in period medical dramas like Breathless, The Knick, and Call the Midwife. We came to this topic upon realizing that these shows, with Call the Midwife being the one exception, emphasize the lives of men and de-emphasize the experiences of women, even when obstetrics and gynecology is the medical focus of the entire show or episode. While it is true that there were more male than female doctors and surgeons during the time periods these shows are set, it is, however, incorrect to labor under the misconception that women were not involved in medical decisions regarding their own bodies. Yet, this is the representation we are given in these medical dramas. To use obstetrics and gynecology to tell a story about scientific progress, the writers implicitly frame women’s knowledge and skills as backward, reinforcing the notion that women are irrational and, thus, need to be saved from their own bodies by the knowledge of men.

Subscribe here: tinyletter.com/ladyscience
Info and issue descriptions at: ladyscience.com
____

Edited by:

Leila McNeill

Recently received a MA in History of Science focusing on midwifery, public health, and popular medical texts for women in the nineteenth century.
Contact: @leilasedai, leilawritesstuff.com

Anna Reser
Currently completing an MA thesis in History of Technology about the myth, memory and men of the American space program.
Contact: @annanreser, annareser.com

The first issue will hit inboxes on Friday October 17!
____

More information about Ada Lovelace Day here: findingada.com
____

Interested in writing for Lady Science? Send a brief email with your proposal and a bit of information about yourself to ladyscienceinfo@gmail.com.

Ashley McCray Selected as Champion of Change

On Tuesday, September 15, the White House honored eleven young women as “Champions of Change,” women who are empowering their communities. In addition to honoring these young people for their courage and contributions, the goal of the event was to inspire girls and young women to recognize their potential for leadership — as educators, advocates, peer-mentors, artists and entrepreneurs — and to appreciate that they can be leaders in their own way and in their own style.

Included among this year’s “Champions of Change” is HSCI PhD candidate, Ashley McCray. Ashley’s research focuses on indigenous knowledge; environment and public health in minority communities; and race and science and the native experience in the university. Ashley is from the Oglala and Sicangu Lakota nations and the Absentee Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma, where she is currently an enrolled tribal member and where she serves her tribe as archivist. Ashley has worked to ensure the University incorporates inclusivity and diversity in its curriculum and has helped inspire mandatory diversity training for incoming students. She has contributed to a series of diversity and inclusivity workshops facilitated at OU for faculty, students, and staff.

More information is available at: https://geneva.usmission.gov/2015/09/14/white-house-honors-young-women-empowering-their-communities-as-champions-of-change/.


Paleo Porch Mini Mobile Museum Goes to OU Mini-College Camp